• Watching Darkness Fall: Roosevelt and The Rise of Hitler’s Germany with David McKean

    Air Dates: January 17-23, 2022

    In the 1930s, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt saw war coming with Hitler’s Germany even as he reconciled the isolationism of American politics with his own internationalist instinct.  Ambassador David McKean tells the story of FDR’s personal reliance on his hand-picked ambassadors to Europe in the critical years before America’s entry into World War II.

    David McKean served as United States Ambassador to Luxembourg from 2016-2017.  He currently serves as a Consensus member at the American Security Project and is a Visiting Distinguished Fellow at the German Marshall Fund of the United States.  Previously, he was the Director of Policy Planning at the U.S. Department of State, beginning in February of 2013.  There, he also served as a Senior Advisor to Secretary of State Clinton for the Quadrennial Diplomacy and Development Review.  He is the recipient of the State Department’s Distinguished Honor Award and Superior Honor Award.  McKean spent two decades working in the United States Congress: serving as chief of staff to Senator John Kerry from 1999 to 2008 and chief of staff to Representative Joseph P. Kennedy II from 1993 to 1994.  He served as staff director for the United States Senate Foreign Relations Committee from 2009 to 2010, and minority staff director for the Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations from 1998 to 1999.  McKean was a key player in laying the groundwork for the Senator Kerry’s presidential campaign in 2004 and was a co-chairman of the Senator’s presidential transition team.  In 1997 and 1998, he served as the Minority Staff Director for the U.S. Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations.  McKean is the author of four books on American political history: “Friends in High Places” with Douglas Frantz, “Tommy the Cork,” “The Great Decision” with Cliff Sloan, and “Watching Darkness Fall: FDR, His Ambassadors, and the Rise of Adolf Hitler,” which was published in 2021.

    “Story in the Public Square” continues to broadcast each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m., 4:30 p.m. ET, and Sundays at 2:30 a.m. & 2:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Discussing the Legacy of Confederate Monuments in Richmond and Beyond with Michael Paul Williams

    Air Dates: January 10-16, 2022

    Most Americans want to believe that the United States of America as a bastion of liberal democracy.  But Michael Paul Williams is a columnist whose work exposes the illiberal elements in American society, including white supremacy, banning books, and vigilantism.

    Michael Paul Williams is a native of Richmond and longtime columnist at the Richmond Times Dispatch.  Williams joined The Times Dispatch in 1982 and covered local government for a decade before becoming the paper’s first Black columnist a decade later.  His columns have never shied away from sensitive public issues, including race.  His unflinching truth telling has secured numerous honors; among them a Nieman Fellowship and in 2021, he won a Pulitzer Prize for his series of columns that changed the conversation about race and remembrance in the former capital of the Confederacy following George Floyd’s murder in 2020.  Williams was named the 2021 recipient of the Pell Center Prize for Story in the Public Square, which honors storytellers whose work has a meaningful, positive impact on the public dialogue.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Williams describes the transformation Monument Avenue in Richmond, Virginia underwent in the years following the Confederate monument protests.  The area became a memorial to victims of police violence with light shows on statues, a public garden and a basketball court.  “People really became attached to it,” said Williams.  “They were proud that they had reclaimed this space.”  Today, he says the now-removed statues’ pedestals remain a part of the Richmond landscape.  “They still leave their mark,” adds Williams.

    “Story in the Public Square” continues to broadcast each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m., 4:30 p.m. ET, and Sundays at 2:30 a.m. & 2:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Bringing the Story of America’s Opioid Crisis to the Screen with Danny Strong

    Air Dates: January 3-9, 2022

    According to the CDC, more than 588,000 Americans have died from opioid overdose since 1999.  Danny Strong tells the story of that epidemic in “Dopesick,” a new series on Hulu.

    Danny Strong is one of the most prolific TV and big-screen talents today, with more than 75 acting, screenwriting, producing, directing, show running and creating credits, three directing credits, according to IMDB.  For writing, directing and producing, he is best known for “Recount,” “Game Change,” Lee Daniels’ “The Butler,” and “Mockingjay,” the two-part Hunger Games finale.  He is also known for the 2019 TV series, “Proven Innocent” and the 2017 film, “Rebel in the Rye,” which he directed.  Strong is co-creator of the smash hit, “Empire.”  His acting career begin in 1994, when he was 20, with a role on “Saved by Bell: The New Class.”  His most famous roles since then have been as characters on “Buffy the Vampire Slayer,” “Gilmore Girls,” “Mad Men,” “Justified and Billions.”  Strong’s “Game Change,” the 2012 HBO production about the 2008 presidential election, won a Golden Globe, a primetime Emmy, a Writers Guild of America Award, and a Producers Guild of America Award. His 2008 HBO film “Recount,” about the 2000 presidential election, won an Emmy.  He has won an NAACP Image Award for Empire and been nominated for a Critics Choice Award and a Golden Globe for the show.  Strong was the recipient of the 2014 Pell Center Prize for Story in the Public Square.  Most recently, he is the creator and an executive producer of “Dopesick,” the Hulu eight-part mini-series, of which he directed an episode.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Strong discusses his work on “Dopesick,” creating the series that follows the story of America’s opioid crisis from Purdue pharma’s deceptive marketing campaigns to a country doctor who is prescribing oxycodone to his patients in Appalachia.

    “Story in the Public Square” continues to broadcast each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m., 4:30 p.m. and 2:30 a.m. ET, and Sundays at 2:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Immigration and America’s Dairy Farms with Julie Keller

    Air Dates: June 10-16, 2019

    Rebroadcast Dates: December 27, 2021-January 2, 2022

    The super-heated rhetoric over immigration and border security in the United States today is part of a long tradition of anti-immigration hysteria.  Julie Keller puts our recent panic in a sociological context—exploring changes in who works on American dairy farms, and how they traveled from Latin America to farms in the upper-Mid-West.

    Julie C. Keller is an associate professor of sociology at the University of Rhode Island. She earned her doctorate in sociology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2013 and is the author of “Milking in the Shadows: Migrants and Mobility in America’s Dairyland.”

    “Story in the Public Square” continues to broadcast each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m., 4:30 p.m. and 2:30 a.m. ET, and Sundays at 2:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Adapting to a Warmer Planet: “Fighting Climate Change after COVID-19” with Alice Hill

    Air Dates: December 20-26, 2021

    The planet is warming.  This isn’t conjecture and it isn’t political: it’s the overwhelming conclusion of climate scientists from all over the world.  Now, for a long time, the debate has been over whether and how we mitigate the threats posed by climate change.  But Alice C. Hill warns that debate needs to be expanded to include a discussion about the things we must do to adapt human existence to a warmer planet.

    Hill is the David M. Rubenstein senior fellow for energy and the environment at the Council on Foreign Relations.  Her work focuses on the risks, consequences, and responses associated with climate change.  Hill previously served as special assistant to President Barack Obama and senior director for resilience policy on the National Security Council staff where she led the development of national policy to build resilience to catastrophic risks, including climate change and biological threats.  Her coauthored book, “Building a Resilient Tomorrow,” was published in 2019.  In 2020, Yale University and the Op-Ed Project awarded her the Public Voices Fellowship on the Climate Crisis.  Hill’s new book, “The Fight for Climate After COVID-19,” was published in September 2021.  In 2009, Hill served as Senior Counselor to the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, in which she led the formulation of DHS’s first-ever climate adaptation plan and the development of strategic plans regarding catastrophic biological and chemical threats, including pandemics.  While at the Department of Homeland Security, Hill founded and led the internationally recognized anti-human trafficking initiative, the Blue Campaign.  Earlier in her career, Hill served as supervising judge on both the superior and municipal courts in Los Angeles and as chief of the white-collar crime prosecution unit in the Los Angeles U.S. Attorney’s office. The Department of Justice awarded her its highest accolade, the John Marshall Award for Outstanding Legal Achievement.

    “Story in the Public Square” continues to broadcast each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m., 4:30 p.m. and 2:30 a.m. ET, and Sundays at 2:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Colin Woodard Named Visiting Senior Fellow at Salve Regina University’s Pell Center

    NEWPORT, RI—Best-selling author Colin Woodard has been named a Visiting Senior Fellow at Salve Regina University’s Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy.  The author of six books, including “Union: The Struggle to Forge the Story of United States Nationhood” as well as “American Nations: A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America” Woodard will build a Pell Center initiative focused on the preservation of American democracy.

    International observers and democracy experts have warned that the United States is experiencing “democratic backsliding” as voting becomes more difficult, Congress seems ineffective, and gerrymandering alters the prospects for responsive politics across the United States.  The “Big Lie” pushed by former President Donald Trump—that the 2020 election was stolen from him—and the January 6 insurrection inspired by those claims underscore the peril to American democracy.

    “We booked Colin for an episode of ‘Story in the Public Square,’” the five-time Telly Award-winning public affairs show produced by the Pell Center for public television and SiriusXM, said Executive Director Jim Ludes.  “To get ready, I read ‘Union,’ and I was blown away by its sweep, its power, and its meaning for today.  Here is a scholar and a gifted storyteller who reminds us that the power of story is central to America’s national existence.”  Ludes continued, “But Colin isn’t just a gifted historian and author.  He recognizes that America needs a story that unifies it in the 21st century, and he’s willing to help contribute to it.  That project fits perfectly with what we’re doing at the Pell Center,” Ludes concluded, “and we’re excited to work with him.”

    “I’m excited to be working with the Pell Center — with its commitment to interdisciplinary research and to connecting the worlds of scholarship and public policy — on these vital issues confronting the United States,” Woodard said. “I started my career in Eastern Europe and the Balkans during and after the collapse of the Soviet empire, where nation-states and federations were revisiting their histories and national myths, arguing over who truly belonged and who did not, trying to build liberal democracies or consolidate ethno-nationalist regimes — by means of genocide and civil war in some cases. Those experiences have always informed my work on North America’s history, but in recent years have become alarmingly relevant to our present trajectory, with the near-term survival of the American Experiment now far from certain.”

    A New York Times bestselling historian and Polk Award-winning journalist, Colin Woodard is one of the most respected authorities on North American regionalism, the sociology of United States nationhood, and how our colonial past shapes and explains the present. Author of the award winning Wall Street Journal bestseller “American Nations: A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America,” Woodard has written six books including “American Character: The Epic Struggle Between Individual Liberty and the Common Good” — a Chautauqua Prize Finalist and winner of the 2016 Maine Literary Award for Non-Fiction — and “Union: The Struggle to Forge the Story of United States Nationhood,” which tells the harrowing story of the creation of the American myth in the 19th century, a story that reverberates in the news cycle today.

    Colin Woodard is a POLITICO contributing editor and the State and National Affairs Writer at the Portland Press Herald and Maine Sunday Telegram, where he received a 2012 George Polk Award and was a finalist for the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Explanatory Reporting. A longtime foreign correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor, The San Francisco Chronicle, and The Chronicle of Higher Education, he has reported from more than fifty foreign countries and seven continents from postings in Budapest, Zagreb, Washington, D.C. and the US-Mexico border and covered the collapse of communism in Eastern Europe and its bloody aftermath. His work has appeared in dozens of publications including The Economist, The New York Times, Smithsonian, The Washington Post, The Guardian, Newsweek and Washington Monthly and has been featured on CNN, the “Rachel Maddow Show,” Chuck Todd’s “The Daily Rundown,” “The PBS News Hour,” and NPR’s “Weekend Edition.”

    Colin has been an expert for numerous television documentaries on Discovery Channel, the History Channel, Netflix, the Smithsonian Channel, and TLC and was a historical consultant for an Ubisoft video game inspired by “The Republic of Pirates,” a New York Times bestselling history of Blackbeard’s pirate gang that was made into a primetime NBC series with John Malkovich and Claire Foye. He’s spoken around the world, from the Smithsonian and the Chautauqua Institution to the European Parliament, the German Marshall Fund’s Atlantic Dialogues conference in Marrakesh, and the Asahi Shimbun’s Asahi World Forum in Tokyo.

    His previous books include the New England Bestseller “The Lobster Coast: Rebels, Rusticators and the Struggle for a Forgotten Frontier,” a cultural history of coastal Maine; and “Ocean’s End: Travels Through Endangered Seas.”  American Nations also won a Maine Literary Award and was named a 2011 Book of the Year by both The New Republic and The Globalist, an honor Union received from The Christian Science Monitor in 2021.

    Colin is a graduate of Tufts University (B.A., History) and the University of Chicago (M.A., International Relations) and is a past Pew Fellow in International Journalism at the Johns Hopkins University School for Advanced International Study. He received the 2004 Jane Bagley Lehman Award for Public Advocacy and was named 2014 Journalist of the Year by the Maine Press Association and one of the Best State Capitol Reporters in America by the Washington Post. He lives in Maine.

  • The 2021 Story of the Year with Dr. Evelyn Farkas

    Air Dates: December 13-19, 2021

    2021 is the second year of the pandemic, and it began, almost immediately, with a violent insurrection at the United States Capitol.  Dr. Evelyn Farkas helps us put the big stories of the last 12 months in context even as we name the top story of 2021.

    Dr. Farkas has three decades of experience working on national security and foreign policy in the U.S. executive and legislative branches, the private sector and for international organizations overseas.  In 2019-2020, she ran to represent New York’s 17th Congressional District in the House of Representatives.  She is currently President of Farkas Global Strategies.  She was previously a Senior Fellow at the German Marshall Fund of the United States and the Atlantic Council and a National Security Contributor for NBC/MSNBC.   From 2012 to 2015, Farkas served as Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Russia, Ukraine, Eurasia, the Balkans, and the Caucasus and conventional arms control.  From 2010 to 2012 she served as Senior Advisor to the Supreme Allied Commander Europe and Special Advisor to the Secretary of Defense for the NATO Summit.  Prior to that, she was Executive Director of the Commission on the Prevention of Weapons of Mass Destruction Proliferation and Terrorism and senior fellow at the American Security Project.  From 2001 to 2008, she served as a Professional Staff Member of the Senate Armed Services Committee responsible for the Asia-Pacific region, the Western Hemisphere, Special Operations Command and policy issues including combatting terrorism, and export control.  From 1997-2001 Farkas was a professor of international relations at the U.S. Marine Corps Command and Staff College.  She served 1996-97 in Bosnia with the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE).  She has published numerous journal articles and opinion pieces, in addition to her book, “Fractured States and U.S. Foreign Policy: Iraq, Ethiopia, and Bosnia in the 1990s.”

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Farkas joins hosts Jim Ludes and G. Wayne Miller to discuss the 2021 Story of the Year: “The Big Lie and the Insurrection of January 6, 2021.”

    As a candidate in 2016, Donald Trump said the only way he would lose the election was if it was stolen from him.  In the summer of 2020, he began singing that same refrain.  Rather than simple red-meat to stir up his base, Donald Trump continued to challenge the results of the election well after Election Day, well after votes were certified in state capitals, well after the Electoral College had voted.  In the hours prior to Congress certifying the results of the Electoral College, President Trump, his lawyers, and his enablers continued to press the lie that the election had been stolen.

    Tragically for anyone who cares about American democracy, President Trump wasn’t alone.  Senator Lindsay Graham of South Carolina reportedly pressured election officials in Georgia.  Trump himself asked the Secretary of State, there, to help him find a specific number of votes.  As journalists Bob Woodward and Robert Costa documented, the President even pressured Vice President Mike Pence to throw the Constitution into peril by claiming to have an authority to reject votes in the U.S. Senate that he did not have.

    Then, on the morning of January 6, 2021, President Trump spoke to a rally of his supporters on the mall in Washington before encouraging them to march to the Capitol.  Once there, the marchers didn’t stop at the gates to the Capitol grounds.  They forced their way past police barricades and fought pitched battles with Capitol and DC police for hours—breaching the Capitol, the chamber of the U.S. House, and the U.S. Senate before order was restored.

    But by then, the world had witnessed an insurrection on American soil that threatened the peaceful transfer of power from one president to the next.  It shouldn’t surprise anyone that Donald Trump refused to attend the inauguration of President Joe Biden.

    And in the months that followed, Donald Trump has repeated the lie that this election was stolen from him, again and again.  In doing so, he’s not just setting the stage for a political comeback in 2024, he’s undermining the central pillars of our democratic republic: confidence in the integrity of our elections.

    “Story in the Public Square” continues to broadcast each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m., 4:30 p.m. and 2:30 a.m. ET, and Sundays at 2:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Examining the Expectations Placed on Women Through the Lens of Sport with Lindsay Crouse

    Air Dates: December 6-12, 2021 

    The demands society places on women—the choices they make about their lives, their relationships, and their appearance—can be overwhelming.  Lindsay Crouse exposes those expectations to the bright light of day and forces all of us to consider our own roles in them.

    Crouse is a film producer and senior editor at The New York Times.  A Rhode Island native, she graduated from Harvard University, where she competed in both track and field and cross-country sports events.  She helped produce the 2017 documentary 4.1 Miles, which won an award at the 2017 Peabody awards.  Crouse first wrote about the female athletes who wanted to become mothers and faced pressure to continue competing and training that would jeopardize their health and pregnancy outcomes in October 2014.  In May 2019, she reported on Nike’s lack of maternity support for the female athletes it sponsors.  She produced a video interview and wrote an op-ed, about distance runner Mary Cain, entitled “I Was the Fastest Girl in America, Until I Joined Nike,” which was critical of both Nike and its chief coach, Alberto Salazar, for the grueling training methods and negative culture that profoundly affected Cain’s mental and physical health.  Following the publication of the article, Salazar was permanently suspended from participating in track and field events by the U.S. Center for SafeSport, a nonprofit that protect athletes from sexual, physical and emotional abuse.  She recently published the article, “Cancel Culture’ Isn’t the Problem. ‘OK Culture’ Is,” in response to the scandal involving John Gruden, former head coach of the Las Vegas Raiders.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Crouse discusses using sport as a lens through which we can examine established societal norms and the inequities women continue to face.

    Story in the Public Square” continues to broadcast each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m., 4:30 p.m. and 2:30 a.m. ET, and Sundays at 2:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • America’s Search for National Identity with Colin Woodard

    Air Dates: November 29-December 3, 2021

    There are some who argue that the United States of America as a nation, should be defined by its civic identity. A federal Republic that’s found he promised equality under the law and Liberty to all of its people. But there’s a darker side to the American history too, one built on ethnonationalism and white supremacy.  Colin Woodard traces the rise and fall, and rise again of these competed ideas, over the long arc of our national history.

    Woodard is a New York Times bestselling author, historian and Polk Award-winning journalist.  He is a respected authority on North American regionalism, the sociology of United States nationhood, and how our colonial past shapes and explains the present.  He is a POLITICO contributing editor and the State and National Affairs Writer at the Portland Press Herald and Maine Sunday Telegram, where he was a finalist for the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Explanatory Reporting.  A longtime foreign correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor, The San Francisco Chronicle, and The Chronicle of Higher Education, for which he has reported from more than fifty countries.  Author of the award winning “American Nations: A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America,” Woodard has written six books including “The Republic of Pirates,” a New York Times bestselling history of Blackbeard’s pirate gang that was made into a primetime NBC series with John Malkovich and Claire Foye, and “Union: The Struggle to Forge the Story of United States Nationhood.”  His work has appeared in dozens of publications including The Economist, The New York Times, Smithsonian, The Washington Post, The Guardian, Newsweek and Washington Monthly.

    Story in the Public Square” continues to broadcast each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m., 4:30 p.m. and 2:30 a.m. ET, and Sundays at 2:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • The Winter of Peril with Robert Costa

    Air Dates: November 22-28, 2021

    Every president, every public servant in the United States, raises their hand and takes an oath to support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic.  Robert Costa says the end of the Trump presidency saw an unprecedented threat to the Constitutional order emanating from the White House itself.

    Robert Costa is co-author of the new book, “Peril,” with Bob Woodward.  He has been a national political reporter at The Washington Post since 2014 and previously served as moderator and managing editor of “Washington Week” on PBS until 2021.  He was a political analyst for NBC News and MSNBC before that.  Costa joined Washington Week with nearly a decade of reporting experience that began with coverage of movement politics and Capitol Hill, including the battle over health care policy during the Obama presidency and the 2010 mid-term elections.  In 2012, he covered the race for the Republican presidential nomination and published interviews with all the major candidates.  He holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Notre Dame and a master’s degree from the University of Cambridge.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Costa discusses his reporting on the January 6th attacks on the U.S. Capitol.  He says, “[As] I dug into the reporting, [it became apparent that] the real story was far darker.  The president of the United States, Donald Trump was coordinating a sprawling vicious pressure campaign, legally, politically, documented with the John Eastman memo we discovered, on his vice-president, the department of justice, members of Congress to prevent Biden from taking office and pushing the election to the house of representatives, where he was confident house Republicans would do his bidding and vote him into another term, despite losing the popular vote and having the electoral college certify the election for Biden in December.  And this wasn’t an ego trip, a moment of narcissism, this was a coordinated effort from the very top of the United States government.”

    Story in the Public Square” continues to broadcast each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m., 4:30 p.m. and 2:30 a.m. ET, and Sundays at 2:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.