• Exploring Loss, Creativity and Change with Maggie Smith

    Air Dates: November 9-15, 2020

    It is one of the cruel realities of life for every nation and every individual: we all suffer loss and disappointment.  Maggie Smith is a poet whose new book offers wisdom—and hope—for anyone who knows that pain.

    Smith is the author of four books of poetry, including “Good Bones,” “The Well Speaks of Its Own Poison” and “Lamp of the Body.”  Her latest book, “Keep Moving: Notes on Loss, Creativity, and Change,” a collection of essays and quotes, was released in October.  She is also the author of three prizewinning chapbooks.  Her poems are widely published and anthologized, appearing in Best American Poetry, the New York Times, The New Yorker, Tin House, POETRY, The Paris Review, Ploughshares, and elsewhere.  In 2016, her poem “Good Bones” went viral internationally and has been translated into nearly a dozen languages.  Public Radio International called it “the official poem of 2016.”

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Smith says her latest book began as a series of Twitter posts she created as a way of talking herself through a difficult time. She says posting those thoughts in a public space added accountability and she experienced a sense of community that helped her realize she wasn’t alone. She shares an excerpt from “Keep Moving” that reads, “try to shift your thinking away from loss and toward growth. Consider this difficult time a ‘gap year’ between your last life and what might happen next. “Think of it as the first (messy, brave, hard, exhilarating) year of your new life. Keep moving.”

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

     

  • The Coronavirus and the Entertainment Industry with Kate Aurthur

    Air Dates: November 2-8, 2020

    The pandemic has changed a lot of habits—including the ways in which people around the world spend their leisure time and resources.  Kate Aurthur tells us that the entertainment industry—literally built on storytelling—has been among the most effected.

    Aurthur is a veteran entertainment journalist and is editor-at-large at Variety.  She has worked as a top reporter and editor at BuzzFeed News, the Los Angeles Times and the New York Times.  She writes high-impact cover and feature stories about the industry for Variety’s weekly magazine, breaking news on Variety.com and contributes to its video content.  She covers major issues and business trends in TV, film and streaming as the consumption of content across all distribution platforms, including Netflix, Amazon and Apple, continues to reshape the media landscape.  Aurthur also writes about diversity and inclusion in Hollywood, both in front of and behind the camera, profiles prominent writers, directors, producers and actors and covers key festivals and events.  She also contributes to Variety franchises including Actors on Actors, and moderates panel discussions at the company’s summits and conferences.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Aurthur describes the coronavirus’ widespread impact on the American entertainment industry.  As movie theaters closed early this year, she says release dates for many blockbusters were postponed and some were made available through streaming services.  She adds that streaming services were already challenging movie theaters before the virus began and will continue to impact the way consumers experience feature films in the future.

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Principled Leadership with Susan Eisenhower

    Air Dates: October 26-November 1, 2020

    In the pantheon of American presidents, perhaps none was better prepared for the job than Dwight D. Eisenhower.  Susan Eisenhower shares with us the principles that guided Ike in war and in peace.

    Eisenhower is the CEO and Chairman of The Eisenhower Group, Inc., a Washington D.C. based consulting company founded in 1986, which has provided strategic counsel on business development, public affairs and communications projects for more than twenty-five years.  She is the Chairman Emeritus at the Eisenhower Institute of Gettysburg College, where she served as president twice.  She has also had a distinguished career as a policy analyst and has been a Fellow at Harvard’s Institute of Politics and a Distinguished Fellow at the Nixon Center, now the Center for National Interest.  She is the author of the recently published biography, “How Ike Led: The Principles Behind Eisenhower’s Biggest Decisions.”  In addition to “How Ike Led,” Eisenhower has written four trade press books, two of which were on regional best seller lists and has co-authored or co-edited four other books on international security issues and has authored hundreds of op-eds for newspapers such as the Washington Post and the LA Times.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Susan Eisenhower describes the guiding principles and depth of experience President Eisenhower drew from throughout his life.  She adds that leading the way her grandfather did was a conscious decision on his part.  “I think we were lucky that we had a military man who was arguably the most nonpartisan president we’ve had since certainly the 20th Century. He put his country first. And we should remember that and strive for it.”

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Fighting Misinformation and the Pandemic with Ashish Jha

    Air Dates: October 19-25, 2020

    Whatever the final count of fatalities is in the United States from the COVID-19 pandemic, the cost is already far too high.  Dr. Ashish Jha reminds us that there are still simple things that Americans can do to stay safe, to stay healthy, and to help fight the pandemic.

    Jha is a practicing physician and is the Dean of the Brown School of Public Health and professor of Health Services, Policy, and Practice after serving as the director of the Harvard Global Health Institute and teaching at the Harvard School of Public Health and Harvard Medical School.  He has been recognized as a global expert on pandemic preparedness and response in addition to health policy research and practice.  He has led groundbreaking research around Ebola and is now on the frontlines of the COVID-19 response, leading national and international analysis of key issues and advising state and federal policy makers. Jha has published more than two hundred original research publications in prestigious journals including the BMJ and New England Journal of Medicine and is a frequent contributor to a range of public media. He has conducted extensive research on improving the quality of health care and the reduction of its costs, focusing on the impact of public health policy both nationally and globally.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Jha addresses the segment of the population who are not following basic public health measures.  He says he feels sympathy, knowing many Americans are experiencing “pandemic fatigue” and are dealing with a “a deluge of misinformation.”  He says, “you can understand why some people might think, well maybe it’s not so bad, maybe it is overstated, and that makes it harder for people to constantly be wearing the mask, to constantly be doing social distancing.”  He adds, “from a policy point of view, we’ve got to counter that misinformation, and we need our leaders to counter that misinformation.”

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Pell Center And Salve Regina University Partner with DHS For National Cybersecurity Awareness Month

    Newport, RI – For the sixth year in a row, the Pell Center and Salve Regina University are supporting the annual Department of Homeland Security’s campaign as a National Cybersecurity Awareness Month (NCSAM) Champion Organization, participating in a growing global effort, to promote online safety awareness with the theme: STOP. THINK. CONNECT.

    Now in its 17th year, National Cybersecurity Awareness Month (NCSAM) continues to raise awareness about the importance of cybersecurity across our Nation, ensuring that all Americans have the resources they need to be safer and more secure online.

    In support of the campaign, Pell Center Executive Director Jim Ludes will deliver the keynote address on information security & protecting critical information within networks as a part of the Council for Electronic Revenue Communication Advancement 2020 Fall Conference on October 21, 2020.

    Additionally, Salve Regina University will hold a virtual Cybersecurity Career Seminar on October 21.  The event will feature a panel discussion with Salve Regina alumni and faculty, including Darwin Salazar, Senior Product Security Analyst at Johnson & Johnson, Giuliana Sandonato, Senior Software Engineer at Raytheon Missiles & Defense, Barrett Wann, professor of Administration of Justice, Homeland Security and Cybersecurity and Intelligence at Salve Regina University and Defense Intelligence Agency Account Executive at CACI International Inc., and Francesca Spidalieri, senior fellow for Cyber Leadership at the Pell Center, where she leads the Rhode Island Corporate Cybersecurity Initiative (RICCI).  This seminar will cover cybersecurity careers with discussion on the widening gap between the demand of cybersecurity professionals and the supply of a skilled workforce.  Each panelist will discuss their respective career paths and offer insight into what Salve Regina can offer to students who wish to pursue a cyber-focused degree, either as an undergraduate or a graduate student.  The event is co-sponsored by the Pell Center, the Office of Career Development, and the Office of Graduate Studies and Continuing Education at Salve Regina. Register for this webinar here.

    On October 28th, the Pell Center will host a panel discussion on election security, moderated by Francesca Spidalieri.  The discussion will explore some of the key issues surrounding election security and cyberattacks and cover strategies and solutions to securing the integrity and availability of our elections.  It will also highlight specific measures adopted by many state and local election jurisdictions to keep elections secure and accurate and to ensure public confidence in the work of their local governments.  Panelists include Dr. David Mussington, Director of the Center for Public Policy and Private Enterprise and Professor of the Practice at the University of Maryland School of Public Policy, Derek Tisleris, a fellow and counsel with the Brennan Center for Justice’s Democracy Program, and David Levine, who is the Elections Integrity Fellow at the Alliance for Securing Democracy. Register for this event here.

    To raise community awareness, the Salve Regina’s Cybersecurity Team will be engaging the community in a series of exercises in ways cybercriminals would attempt to infiltrate our systems and networks.  Additionally, the Office of Information Technology at Salve Regina will host an online cybersecurity presentation with a Q&A session.  More programming details and additional cybersecurity awareness resources on Salve Regina’s NCSAM page on the new Campus Portal.

  • Russia’s History of Covert Electoral Influence with David Shimer

    Air Dates: October 12-18, 2020

    Over the last four years, Americans have heard a lot about Russian interference in our elections. David Shimer says we haven’t heard the whole story about the Cold War, 2016, or 2020.

    Shimer is an expert on election security, U.S.-Russian relations, and covert action.  He is the author of “Rigged: America, Russia, and One Hundred Years of Covert Electoral Interference,” a New York Times Editors’ Choice book.  His reporting and analysis have been published in the New York Times, the New Yorker, the Washington Post, and Foreign Affairs.  He has appeared on CNN and MSNBC to discuss the threat of foreign election interference, and he has been interviewed by the New York Times, NPR, and Politico about American and Russian foreign policy.  Shimer is an Associate Fellow of Yale University, where he received his undergraduate and master’s degrees in history, and is pursuing a doctorate in international relations at the University of Oxford as a Marshall Scholar.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Shimer describes writing his book “Rigged” to detail the history of Russia’s covert electoral interference to what came before its operation in the U.S. presidential election in 2016.  He says Russia’s foreign policy has evolved from spreading communism to tearing down democracy and from engaging in an ideological struggle to a power struggle.  He adds, “Russia’s strategy to divide democracies from within […] gives [it] new opportunities for influence, which is why you’ve seen Russia supporting authoritarian-minded, divisive candidates and causes around the world.”

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

     

  • Child and Adolescent Mental Health in the COVID-19-Era with Gayani DeSilva

    Air Dates: October 5-11, 2020

    Pandemic, social unrest–Americans of every age are coping with the mental health consequences of this era.  Dr. Gayani DeSilva cautions that the challenges of being a child or adolescent currently poses special health risks.

    DeSilva has been a psychiatrist for 15 years and focusses on enhancing the mental health of children and adolescents and their families.  Much of her work addresses the complex array of needs with adolescent and young adult criminal and violent offenders to understand the interplay between mental illness, societal factors, and interpersonal issues.  She is the author of “A Psychiatrist’s Guide: Helping Parents Reach Their Depressed Tween,” and “A Psychiatrist’s Guide: Stop Teen Addiction Before It Starts.”  DeSilva obtained her medical training at Albany Medical College and completed her internship at Brown University, and her residency at Harvard University.  She holds numerous awards and citations, and currently is on volunteer faculty at the University of California-Irvine and is Medical Director of Behavioral Health at Inland Empire Health Plan.  DeSilva also co-hosts the podcast, “Chat and Chai,” which consists of 13 episodes, including “A Candid Conversation on Racism,” “A Discussion on Suicide, Warning Signs, Myths and More,” and “COVID-19 & Loneliness.”

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” DeSilva encourages parents to remain transparent and model healthy modes of coping with stressful situations like the pandemic.  She suggests inviting children and young adults to be participants in healthy coping strategies, thus helping families to handle difficult situations collectively.

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • A Public Health Perspective on COVID-19 with Megan Ranney

    Air Dates: September 28-October 4, 2020

    COVID-19 has put America’s top doctors on the frontlines of a battle to save lives.  Dr. Megan Ranney spends her days at the front, working in an urban emergency room where her training in public health and emergency medicine give her unique insights about the pandemic and the nation’s response.

    Ranney is a practicing emergency physician and researcher, focusing on the intersection between digital health, violence prevention, and public health.  She is the current Warren Alpert Endowed Associate Professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine at Rhode Island Hospital/Alpert Medical School of Brown University.  Ranney is also the founding Director of the Brown-Lifespan Center for Digital Health and Chief Research Officer for the American Foundation for Firearm Injury Reduction in Medicine, the country’s only non-profit committed to using the public health approach to reduce firearm injury.  She a founding partner of GetUsPPE.org, dedicated to matching donors to health systems in need of protective equipment.  She completed her internship and residency in Emergency Medicine, Master of Public Health, and fellowship in Injury Prevention Research at Brown University.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Ranney describes the virtual forums where she and other doctors shared their experiences and best-practices for treating COVID-19 in the early weeks of the pandemic.  She says, “[COVID-19] is utterly different from any other illness that we’ve seen, and it is disorienting to be trying to practice and to present our patients with decisions, to present families with guidance when we’re still lacking so much of that basic medical evidence.”

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Examining the Broad Reaches Systemic Racism with Tricia Rose

    Air Dates: September 21-27, 2020

    Americans took to the streets after the murder of George Floyd, rejecting racism in all its forms. Tricia Rose explains that structural racism has a long history in the United States—and so do the efforts to combat it.

    Rose is Director of the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America at Brown University. She also holds the Chancellor’s Professorship of Africana Studies and serves as the Associate Dean of the Faculty for Special Initiatives. A graduate of Yale and Brown University, Rose authored “Black Noise: Rap Music and Black Culture in Contemporary America,” “Longing to Tell: Black Women Talk about Sexuality and Intimacy,” and “The Hip Hop Wars: What We Talk About When We Talk About Hip Hop and Why It Matters.” She sits on the Boards of the Nathan Cummings Foundation, Color of Change, and Black Girls Rock, Inc.. Focusing on issues related to race in America, mass media, structural inequality, popular culture, gender and sexuality and art and social justice, Rose engages widely in scholarly and popular audience settings. She co-hosts the weekly “The Tight Rope” podcast with Dr. Cornel West, covering a range of topics from pop culture and art and music, to the contours of systemic racism, philosophy, the power of Socratic self-examination.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Rose distinguishes between different categories of racism. When referring to systemic, structural racism specifically, she says the vast network of institutions involved creates “a systemic set of forces that produce chronic and adverse outcomes for people of color.” She adds that its systemic nature means “it is not easily resolved by simply fixing one area or fixing a few areas at once in a short-term period of time.”

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • 2020 Fall Event Series Announced

    The Pell Center is pleased to announce its 2020 fall event series.  Tickets to these events are free and will be available about two weeks prior to the event date.  Please RSVP for each event on the Pell Center’s Eventbrite page and call 401-341-2927 or email [email protected] with questions.  Scroll to the bottom of this page to sign up for our email list and be notified when tickets become available.  All events will take place virtually on the Pell Center’s Facebook page at 7:00 p.m. EST/EDT.

     

    The Constitution and Foreign Affairs

    Dr. Anthony C. Arend, Georgetown University

    September 17, 2020, 7:00 p.m.

    Location: Facebook.com/PellCenter

    In partnership with the Pell Honors Program.

     

    How Did We Get Here? A Conversation with Presidential Historian Robert Dallek

    Dr. Robert Dallek, University of California, Los Angeles

    October 1, 2020, 7:00 p.m.

    Location: Facebook.com/PellCenter

    This event is made possible by the generous support of the John E. McGinty Fund in History.

     

    2020 Election Security: Threats, Strategies, & Solutions

    Panelists:

    Dr. David Mussington, Director of the Center for Public Policy and Private Enterprise

    Derek Tisler, Fellow and Counsel, Brennan Center for Justice’s Democracy Program

    Francesca Spidalieri, Senior Fellow, Pell Center

    October 24, 2020, 7:00 p.m.

    Location: Facebook.com/PellCenter

     

    COVID-19 and the Fight for Social Justice

    Dr. Faith Mitchell, Intermittent Institute Fellow, Center on Nonprofits and Philanthropy and the Health Policy Center

    November 18, 2020, 7:00 p.m.

    Location: Facebook.com/PellCenter

     

    What’s Next? Discussion of the Election Results

    Panelists:

    Evelyn Farkas, President, Farkas Global Strategies

    David Shuster, Emmy award winning broadcast journalist

    November 10, 2020, 7:00 p.m.

    Location: Facebook.com/PellCenter

     

    China Rising: The Future of U.S. China Relations

    Panelists:

    Ambassador Nicholas Platt, served as ambassador to Pakistan, Philippines, Zambia and high-level diplomat in Canada, China, Hong Kong and Japan. He is the former president of The Asia Society.

    Dr. Gary Jefferson, Carl Marks Professor of International Trade and Finance, Brandeis University and renowned specialist on the China economy.

    Dr. Lewis Rutherfurd is a pioneer venture capital investor in China and other emerging markets in Asia. He also serves as a consultant to the Pell Center.

    December 8, 2020, 7:00 p.m.

    Location: Facebook.com/PellCenter