• “Story in the Public Square” Wins Bronze in 42nd-Annual Telly Awards

    NEWPORT, RI (May 25, 2021) – “Story in the Public Square” has won bronze for excellence in Public Interest Television in the 42nd Annual Telly Awards, the fifth Telly Award win for the nationally-broadcast show.

    This year, “Story in the Public Square” was honored with a bonze award for its 2020 episode featuring Elizabeth Rush, author of “Rising: Dispatches from the New American Shore,” a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in General Nonfiction and the 2020 Reading Across Rhode Island selectee from the Rhode Island Center for the Book.

    “I’m simply humbled by this honor,” said Jim Ludes, co-executive producer and co-host. “The last 15 months have been so hard for so many people. We’ve been grateful that we could simply continue to produce the show and work with our great team.”

    “This means the world to us,” said G. Wayne Miller, co-executive producer and co-host. “After every episode, Jim and I talk about how lucky we are to be able to bring these guests to our audience.  We’re grateful to every single one of them.”

    “Story in the Public Square” won both a Silver and Bronze award in the 41st Annual Telly Awards for its 2019 episode featuring Daniel Okrent, prize-winning author of “The Guarded Gate” on the remarkable history of the bigotry that lay at the heart of the Immigration Act of 1924 and its 2019 episode with Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha, author of “What the Eyes Don’t See,” a memoir of her role in exposing the water crisis in Flint, Michigan. The show also won Bronze in the same category in the 40th Annual Telly Awards for its 2018 episode on the death penalty featuring Sr. Helen Prejean, the author of “Dead Man Walking,” and in the 39th Annual Telly Awards with a Bronze for its 2017 end of year special featuring Dr. Evelyn Farkas.

    “Story in the Public Square” is broadcast more than 380 times each week on public television stations across the United States. Locally, the show can be seen on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Mondays at 2:30 a.m. ET, and Saturdays at 8:30 a.m., 4:30 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center at Salve Regina University and The Providence Journal.

    Established in 1979, the Telly Awards honor excellence in video and television across all screens. The 42nd annual Telly Awards received a 15 percent increase in entries from the previous year. The growth was driven by a significant rise in remote and virtual productions, with many brands taking to animation for the first time. Winners are selected from over 12,000 entries from all 50 states and five continents and judged by an industry body of over 200 leading video and television experts from some of the most prestigious companies in entertainment, publishing, advertising, and emerging technology, including executives from Dow Jones, Duplass Brothers Productions, WarnerMedia, NBC News, A&E Networks, ESPN Films and Vimeo, to name a few.

    The full list of the 42nd Annual Telly Awards winners can be found here.

  • Discussing the State of Asian-American-Targeted Violence with Janelle Wong

    Air Dates: May 24-30, 2021

    Hate crimes are nothing new to members of the Asian American community.  Dr. Janelle Wong helps us put them in historical context—from the Asian Exclusion Acts to the rise in violence targeting Asian Americans during the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Wong is a professor of American Studies and a core faculty member in the Asian American Studies Program at the University of Maryland.  From 2001-2012, Wong was a member of the Departments of Political Science and American Studies and Ethnicity at the University of Southern California.  She received her Ph.D. in 2001 from the Department of Political Science at Yale University. Wong is the author of  “Immigrants, Evangelicals and Politics in an Era of Demographic Change” (2018), “Democracy’s Promise: Immigrants and American Civic Institutions” (2006), and co-author of two books on Asian American politics, including “Asian American Political Participation: Emerging Constituents and their Political Identities” (2011),  which is based on the first national, multilingual, multiethnic survey of Asian Americans.  Wong was a Co-Principal Investigator on the 2016 National Asian American Survey, a nationwide survey of Asian American political and social attitudes and served on the national board of the Association for Asian American Studies from 2014 to 2017.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Wong says the recent spike in violence against Asian Americans is “a kind of reaction that people in the U.S. have had to Asian-Americans in this country since really the beginning of immigration of Asian-Americans to U.S. shores.”  She adds, “there have been times throughout history that Asian Americans have been scapegoated and blamed for potentially bringing disease, bringing their culture, bringing potential kinds of disruptions to U.S. life and this is really part of this longer history.”

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

     

     

     

     

     

  • Season Seven of “Story in the Public Square” Set for July Premier

    May 17, 2021, NEWPORT, RI – “Story in the Public Square,” the four-time Telly-Award winning series from the Pell Center at Salve Regina University and The Providence Journal, will debut its seventh national season on July 5, 2021. The season will feature 24 new episodes seen nationally on public television and heard nationally on SiriusXM Satellite Radio’s P.O.T.U.S. channel

    “Story in the Public Square” provides insights and perspectives into culture, politics and current national and international events with diverse storytellers of every variety—from acclaimed filmmakers, scholars, photographers, journalists, activists, historians, musicians and more.

    The series is the result of the creative collaboration between its hosts, Jim Ludes (Vice President, Salve Regina University) and G. Wayne Miller (Staff Writer, The Providence Journal).  In weekly, 30-minute episodes, the hosts interview great storytellers about their craft and its impact on public life.

    “In the last year, we produced 55 new episodes remotely after the pandemic hit,” said Ludes. “But the constant, the one thing that has carried the show from its earliest days has been the guests—incredible storytellers, scholars, and artists—who don’t just expand our understanding of the world, they expand our understanding of what it means to be human.”

    “Story in the Public Square” has carved a niche for itself, exploring big issues with great guests, but minus the acrimony that distorts other public discussions.

    “Story in the Public Square” is a great collaboration,” said Miller, “a collaboration between us and the crew, the guests, and the audience who bring to each of our conversations the insights earned in their own lives.  We respect all of those partners,” he continued, “and it comes across in a show that we think explores big issues with intelligence and wit.”

    Produced since 2017 from the studios of its flagship television station, Rhode Island PBS, “Story in the Public Square” is currently seen in more than 80% of the nation’s television markets.  It has won Telly Awards for excellence in politics and commentary in 2020 (twice); 2019, and 2018.

    The series is produced by the Pell Center at Salve Regina University and presented by Rhode Island PBS via NETA, the National Educational Telecommunications Association.

    Story in the Public Square:

    On the Web: https://pellcenter.org/story-in-the-public-square/

    On Twitter: @pubstory

    On Facebook: www.facebook.com/StoryInThePublicSquare/

  • Capturing Life in Lyric and Melody with Mariee Sioux

    Air Dates: May 17-23, 2021

    Folk music has a long and rich tradition in the United States, telling stories by capturing life in lyric and melody.  Singer-songwriter Mariee Sioux uses those tools to tell stories that reflect her indigenous heritage.

    Mariee Sioux was raised in a small gold mining town in Northern California and is of Indigenous and Polish Hungarian ancestry.  She was exposed to melody, harmony, and the way music brought community together since childhood, going to Bluegrass festivals, and her father in a bluegrass band.  In connection with her native roots, Sioux values the medicinal qualities of music and believes gathering to share her songs is ultimately for healing purposes.  An abstract storyteller, she serves as a voice for the natural world and trials of humanity through song.  Sioux’s finger-picking guitar has been compared to the greats of Nick Drake and Bert Jansch.  She has extensively toured Europe and the United States, opening for acclaimed artists like Mazzy Star, Buffy St. Marie, Frank Black, Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy, and Joanna Newsom.  She has produced seven records, including “Gift for the End” and “Grief in Exile.”

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Sioux describes the influence her ethnic heritage has had on her music.  Her mother, who has indigenous Californian, indigenous Mexican, and Californian roots is not affiliated with any specific tribe.  Sioux says, “the grief of a lot of our heritage being lost so rapidly over a couple of generations has been something that’s been really impactful to my path [and music.]”  “[M]aking and finding music and singing has been a way back to my ancestry, and back to putting the pieces together that sometimes feel lost.”

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Recap: Reading Across Rhode Island Kick-Off Event: “Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You”

    On March 11, 2021 Salve Regina University’s Pell Center and the Rhode Island Center for the Book hosted a virtual kick-off event for the 2021 “Reading Across Rhode Island” statewide read, “Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You.” The floor was opened to audience members to ask questions for guest speakers Providence Rhode Island Mayor Jorge Elorza, Valerie Tutson, a founding member and executive director of the Rhode Island Black Storytellers, and Maureen Neagle a middle school English teacher at Moses Brown School.

    “Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You” by Dr. Ibram X. Kendi and Jason Raynolds is a New York Times number-one bestseller and a reimagining of Kendi’s “Stamped,” which reveals the history of racist ideas in America and inspires hope for an antiracist future. The book takes the reader on a racial journey from the past to the present and discusses why racism lingers in our society today. It also proves that while racist ideas have always been easy to fabricate and distribute, they can also be discredited and suggests powerful ways readers can identify and stamp out racist thoughts in their daily lives.

    “You see how immigration began to be a wedge issue, the ultimate tribal us versus them,” said Providence Rhode Island mayor Jorge Elorza. He explained that people who harbor “ethnic resentment” generally have kept quiet about these ideals. However, with President Donald Trump speaking more about it, these people have been more comfortable and confident “stepping out the shadows and making their voices heard.” Elzora also explains how he believes that we should talk to people with both heart and mind. He explains that there are principles of equality and justice and there is an inherent dignity in every human being.

    Children being able to learn and understand these concepts at a young age can also help them to grow up being aware of these issues happening in the world around them. “I think you tell them [about the issues] truthfully,” says Val Tutson. Tuston explains how she started with teaching the history of the Underground Railroad for firth grade and then decided to move those lessons to third grade. She says it is important to give students room to ask questions as they learn about these kinds of topics. “I learned about it when I was eight years old,” says Tuston as she recalls her vivid memories of learning about Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad.

    It is important to introduce topics about racial history even to younger children. By learning about these topics at a younger age, it is easier to understand them more clearly. Even if people have differences, it’s important to be able to understand that we all, deep down, come from the same fountains of freedom and equality and to listen to the heart as well as the mind of others.

    Abigail Ransegnola is an English communications student at Salve Regina University and an intern at the Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy.

  • Jonathan Karp Matches Books with Their Audiences

    Air Dates: May 10-16, 2020

    Books have always seemed like self-contained worlds to me.  Pick up a book, and you can transport yourself to any time in history—or the future. Delve into the mystical or the romantic.  Books help us to open our minds and our hearts, and over the last 30 years, Jonathan Karp has put more of those books into hands than just about anyone else.

    Jonathan Karp has been president and CEO of Simon & Schuster since May 2020. He joined Simon & Schuster in June 2010 as publisher of their flagship imprint and was promoted to president and publisher of Simon & Schuster Adult Publishing in 2018.  Karp worked briefly as a reporter for The Providence Journal and then The Miami Herald before being hired in 1989 by Random House.  He worked there for 16 years, rising to editor-in-chief of the Random House division.  He moved to Hachette Book Group in 2005, where he founded the Twelve imprint.  There, Karp published the acclaimed bestselling works, “True Compass” by Edward M. Kennedy, “God Is Not Great” by Christopher Hitchens, and “War” by Sebastian Junger.  Since joining Simon & Schuster, Karp has overseen the publication of “Steve Jobs” by Walter Isaacson, “What Happened” by Hillary Clinton, “Fear” by Bob Woodward, “Frederick Douglass” by David Blight, the winner of the 2019 Pulitzer Prize in History, “Born to Run” by Bruce Springsteen, “In One Person” by John Irving, and “The Library Book” by Susan Orlean.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Karp says the increase in book sales is one of the strange ironies of the pandemic.  “Obviously it’s been a time of great hardship and suffering for a lot of people […] a lot of them are looking for comfort, or guidance, or escape, and they’re buying books.”  He adds the pandemic has been a time where many readers have gravitated toward what is familiar to them, driving back-list sales up. “[A] lot of our best-known titles are selling better than ever, so the book business is actually very healthy right now.”  With about two thousand books being published at Simon & Schuster each year, Karp says it is their responsibility to make sure each of those books finds its audience.

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Creating a Collective Urban Experience with Julian Chambliss

    Air Dates: May 3-9, 2021

    The analytical mind can explain the world around us, but the creative mind can help create our future. Dr. Julian Chambliss explores the power of Afrofuturism in comic books, the expression of creativity in the midst of the pandemic, and the way we think about and process history as a society.

    Chambliss explores the real and imagined city. From planning and community development to comic books and popular culture, his research, teaching, and writing explore how perceptions shape policy and action creating our collective urban experience.  Chambliss studied urban history at the University of Florida and focused his attention on policy formation, culture, regionalism, and civic infrastructure issues.  His research evolved to focus on urban development and culture in U.S. cities.  Chambliss served as Professor of History in the Department of History at Rollins College from 2004 to 2018.  He joined the Department of English at Michigan State University in 2018 with a joint appointment in the Department of History and as core faculty in Consortium for Critical Diversity in a Digital Age Research.  There, he teaches courses exploring critical making, or the process of creative synthesis that animates his class projects, comics and culture in the United States.  In 2019, Chambliss joined the Michigan State University Museum as the Val Berryman Curator of History, where he designs generative digital projects that use the classroom as a platform for students to act as co-researchers to trace community development, document diverse experience and explore culture.  Chambliss is one of the producers of “Every Tongue Got To Confess,” a podcast exploring the experiences and stories of communities of color.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Chambliss discusses his work around Afrofuturism, which he says “…encompasses the consideration of the black past, the black present and the black future. And it kind of epistemology of transformation and liberation that is advocating for a different set of beliefs, practices and structures that protect, nurture and promote a better future.”

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Continuing the Creative Process during the Pandemic with Ida Darvish and Josh Gad

    Air Dates: April 26-May 2, 2021

    The pandemic has had a profound effect on the entertainment industry, disrupting live performances and posing challenges for production in both film and television.  Ida Darvish and Josh Gad are two of the bright lights of Hollywood and they tell us that the creative process continues.

    Ida Darvish is a producer and actor who has played multiple characters in the “Assassin’s Creed” video game franchise, a common house proprietor on “The Mandalorian,” and Marta Alvarez in Tom Hank’s “Inferno.”  She and her husband have both appeared in “She Wants Me,” “The Lost Nomads: Get Lost!,” and “Big Guy.” Together, they run a production company called “Angry Child,” which has produced a number of shows, notably “Central Park” and “1600 Penn.”

    Josh Gad is an actor and singer and is known for voicing Olaf in the “Frozen” franchise, playing LeFou in the live-action adaptation of Disney’s “Beauty and the Beast” and Elder Arnold Cunningham in the Broadway musical “The Book of Mormon,” for which he received a Tony Award nomination for Best Actor in a Musical.  Gad played Skip Gilchrist in the political sitcom “1600 Penn” on NBC, and a fictionalized version of himself on FX’s The Comedians, alongside “Billy Crystal.”  Several of his other film roles include “The Rocker,” “The Internship,” “Love & Other Drugs,” “The Wedding Ringer,” “The Angry Birds Movie,” “A Dog’s Purpose,” “Marshall,” and Agatha Christie’s “Murder on the Orient Express.”  He has also appeared in “ER,” “The Daily Show,” “Modern Family,” “New Girl,” “Bored to Death,” and “Numb3rs.” In 2020, he began starring in the HBO comedy series “Avenue 5.”  His continuing pandemic series, “Reunited Apart,” has been very popular and it raises money for many charitable causes.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” guests Ida Darvish and Josh Gad discuss how the film and television industry has been criticized for its lack of inclusivity and representation in recent years.  Gad says, “one thing that gives me hope is the greatest driver of influence in our industry is hard cash, and when movies like “Black Panther” make a billion dollars at the box office, […] those are game-changers.”  Both Darvish and Gad hope the industry’s recent improvement in this area is a lasting change.

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Covering the 2021 Academy Awards with Pete Hammond

    Air Dates: April 19-25, 2021

    In the midst of a year that saw pandemic disease, social unrest, and bare-knuckled politics, Hollywood churned out a tremendous body of work—even while theaters closed and films created for the big screen streamed directly to our homes.  Pete Hammond says this year’s Academy Awards reflect the issues facing Americans.

    Hammond is currently Chief Film Critic for Deadline Hollywood, where he has been the Awards Columnist, covering the seemingly year-round Oscar and Emmy seasons, for the past seven years.  For the past eight years, he has been Awards Editor and Columnist for Deadline and previously covered a similar column for the Los Angeles Times.  He has also served as a frequent contributor to Variety and as a film critic for Boxoffice magazine, Backstage magazine, Maxim magazine and Movieline.  He is in his seventeenth year as host of the “KCET Cinema Series” in Los Angeles, and UCLA extension’s “Sneak Preview” for the past ten years.  He also hosts the TV series, “Must See Movies,” which showcases classic films every Friday night and Saturday afternoon on KCET.  He is the recipient of five Emmy nominations for his television writing and is the winner of the 1996 Publicists Guild of America’s Press Award.  He is the second journalist in the organization’s 50-year history to receive the award twice, winning again in 2013.  He also served on the Board of Governors for the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences representing writers for six years.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Hammond discusses the challenges the film industry has faced during the pandemic and several of the Academy Award nominees.  He highlights best picture and best sound nominee, “Sound of Metal,” a film about a heavy-metal drummer who is losing his hearing.  Hammond says, “[t]his is a real example of the art of sound.”  Produced by Amazon Studios for streaming, he adds, “this is the kind of movie that would never have been discovered on any big level, even by the Academy, except for the fact that there was an even playing field this year,” with more viewers utilizing streaming services to watch new releases.

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Nuala Pell Leadership Program Selects Fellows for 2021-2022 Academic Year

    Newport, RI—Eleven rising sophomores, juniors and seniors at Salve Regina University have been selected as fellows for the Nuala Pell Leadership Program for the 2021-2022 academic year.  Named in honor of the late Nuala Pell, wife of Sen. Claiborne Pell and an avid supporter of public service, the program is made up of a select number of diverse, high-achieving student fellows at Salve Regina. Directed by Dr. Martha McCann Rose, the Nuala Pell Leadership Program facilitates leadership development with an emphasis on public service through monthly meetings where students meet with leaders in the public sector and explore leadership theory, ethics and the evolution of public issues.

    The 2021-2022 cohort of Nuala Pell Leadership Program fellows include:

    • Alicia Lopez ‘23, history major and global studies minor, Shoreham-Wading River, N.Y.
    • Alejandra Garcia Silva ‘23, cultural and historic preservation and American history dual major, Los Angeles, Calif.
    • Bethany Martin ‘23, elementary and special education dual major, New Bedford, Mass.
    • Brittany Bailey ‘22, administration of justice and psychology dual major, New Haven, Conn.
    • Elizabeth Nickerson ’23, history and secondary education dual major, Chelmsford, Mass.
    • Eric Peck ‘23, administration of justice major and psychology minor, Glastonbury, Conn.
    • Grace Quasebarth ’24, music performance and Spanish dual major and English literature minor, Cleveland, Ohio
    • Jessica Wright ’23European history major, political science minor, Bradford, R.I.
    • Lindsey Smith ‘23, history major and administration of justice minor, Winchendon, Mass.
    • Peter Tsemberides ’22, administration of justice major, Lake Grove, N.Y.
    • Talia Williams ’23, history major, Woonsocket, R.I.