• Celebrating the 2022 Academy Award Nominees with Pete Hammond

    Air Dates: March 21-27, 2022

    The 2022 Academy Award nominations are out.  Pete Hammond says they celebrate a remarkable array of films exploring topics as diverse as toxic masculinity and environmental catastrophe.

    Hammond is widely considered to be one of the preeminent awards analysts for both film and television and is the Chief Film Critic for Deadline Hollywood, where he has also been the Awards Columnist, covering the Oscar and Emmy seasons for the past seven years.  For the past eight years, he has been Awards Editor and Columnist for Deadline and previously covered a similar column for the Los Angeles Times.  He has also served as a frequent contributor to Variety and as a film critic for Boxoffice magazine, Backstage magazine, Maxim magazine and Movieline.  He is in his eighteenth year as host of the “KCET Cinema Series” in Los Angeles, and UCLA extension’s “Sneak Preview” for the past eleven years.  He also hosts the TV series, “Must See Movies,” which showcases classic films every Friday night and Saturday afternoon on KCET.  He is the recipient of five Emmy nominations for his television writing and is the winner of the 1996 Publicists Guild of America’s Press Award.  He is the second journalist in the organization’s 50-year history to receive the award twice, winning again in 2013.  He also served on the Board of Governors for the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences representing writers for six years.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Hammond discusses this year’s Oscar-nominated films and the state of Hollywood and the film industry after two years of the pandemic.

    “Story in the Public Square” continues to broadcast each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m., 4:30 p.m. ET, and Sundays at 1:30 a.m., 2:30 p.m. & 9:30 p.m. ET, and Mondays at 2:30 a.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Laboratories of Autocracy with David Pepper

    Air Dates: March 14-20, 2022

    Politics, at its best, is about getting things done.  At its worst—it’s something much more sinister.  David Pepper warns that some politicians are experimenting, now, with autocracy in statehouses across the United States.

    Pepper is a lawyer, writer, political activist, former elected official and professor, and served as the Chairman of the Ohio Democratic Party between 2015 and 2021, where he was engaged in litigation over voter suppression and election laws in the Buckeye State.  Pepper subsequently appeared in the documentary “All In,” which highlights Stacey Abrams’ nationwide fight for voting rights.  He has written four novels that merge real-world politics and fiction, including “A Simple Choice” and “The People’s House.”  The Wall Street Journal named Pepper “one of the best political-thriller writers on the scene.”  Previously, he served on Cincinnati City Council from 2001-2005.  In 2006, he flipped Hamilton County blue for the first time in 40 years.  He then served on the Commission from 2007-2010, including as its president in 2009-2010.  Pepper was the Democratic candidate for Ohio Auditor in 2010 and Ohio Attorney General in 2014.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Pepper discusses his latest book, “Laboratories of Autocracy: A Wake-Up Call from Behind the Lines.”  He said, “we’re in an era where statehouses are using the levers they have over democracy, they draw up the rules of elections, they draw the districts.”  Pepper adds that state elected officials have leveraged this power with their anonymity on the national level to further their agendas.

    “Story in the Public Square” continues to broadcast each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m., 4:30 p.m. ET, and Sundays at 2:30 a.m. & 2:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Reflecting on the COVID-19 Pandemic and What Lies Ahead with Dr. Megan Ranney

    Air Dates: March 7-13, 2022

    Two years into the pandemic, COVID-19 has taken nearly 1 million American lives.  Dr. Megan Ranney reflects on the experience of these last 24 months and describes the steps we need to take collectively and individually to finally put the pandemic behind us.

    Ranney is a practicing emergency physician, researcher, and advocate for innovative approaches to health.  Her work focuses on the intersection between digital health, violence prevention, and population health.  She is currently the Warren Alpert Endowed Professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine at Rhode Island Hospital/Alpert Medical School of Brown University.  She is a Fellow of the American College of Emergency Physicians.  She is also the Dean of Academics for the Brown University School of Public Health and is the founding Director of the Brown-Lifespan Center for Digital Health.  She is co-founder and Senior Strategic Advisor to the American Foundation for Firearm Injury Reduction in Medicine (AFFIRM) at the Aspen Institute, which creates practical, scalable, and immediate health-based solutions to reduce all forms of firearm-related injuries in the United States. She also serves as president of the board for GetUsPPE.org, a startup dedicated to matching donated personal protective equipment to those who need it most.  She is a Fellow of the fifth class of the Aspen Health Innovators Fellowship Program and a member of the Aspen Global Leadership Network.  She earned her medical degree from Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons in New York City and completed her internship, residency, and chief residency in Emergency Medicine, as well as a fellowship in Injury Prevention Research and a Master of Public Health, at Brown University.

    “Story in the Public Square” continues to broadcast each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m., 4:30 p.m. ET, and Sundays at 2:30 a.m. & 2:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Fighting for Fairness in America’s Justice System with Laura Coates

    Air Dates: February 28-March 6, 2022

    The line between what is right and what is just isn’t always clear.  Laura Coates is a former federal prosecutor who describes how she reconciled ideas of justice, race, the role of law enforcement in our society, and her own role in the U.S. justice system.

    Laura Coates is a CNN senior legal analyst, SiriusXM host and author of “Just Pursuit: A Black Prosecutor’s Fight for Fairness.”  A former federal prosecutor, Coates served as Assistant United States Attorney for the District of Columbia and a Trial Attorney in the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, specializing in the enforcement of voting rights throughout the United States.  As a civil rights attorney, she traveled throughout the nation supervising local and national elections and led investigations into allegations of unconstitutional voting practices.  In private practice, Coates was an intellectual property litigator with expertise in First Amendment and media law.  She is a graduate of Princeton University’s School of Public and International Affairs, and the University of Minnesota Law School.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Coates discusses her book, “Just Pursuit,” which includes stories of people deeply impacted by the American Justice System who personify today’s national issues.

    “Story in the Public Square” continues to broadcast each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m., 4:30 p.m. ET, and Sundays at 2:30 a.m. & 2:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Abusers in Power and Their Impact on Public Issues with Ruth Colker

    Air Dates: February 21-27, 2022

    It’s one thing to say that politics has always been a tough business, but it’s another to confront the reality that public insults have become more frequent, more intense, and more personal.  Ruth Colker explains this is not an accident, but often part of intentional efforts to hijack public issues.

    Colker is a leading scholar in the areas of Constitutional Law and Disability Discrimination and currently serves as the Heck Faust Memorial Chair in Constitutional Law at the Moritz College of Law at the Ohio State University.  She is an award-winning author of 16 books and has published more than 50 articles in law journals including the “Boston University Law Review,” “Columbia Law Journal,” “Georgetown Law Journal,” “Harvard Law Review,” “Michigan Law Journal,” “University of Pennsylvania Law Review,” “University of Virginia Law Review” and “Yale Law Journal.  Her work has been cited by the United States Supreme Court in Tennessee v. Lane, 541 U.S. 509, 527 n.15 (2004), which cited Colker and Milani, “The Post-Garrett World: Insufficient State Protection Against Disability Discrimination,” 53 Ala. L. Rev. 1075 (2002).  In 2014, she was appointed as a disability expert to help resolve a consent decree between the United States Department of Justice and the Law School Admissions Council.  Her work helped change the way the LSAC determines whether applicants are entitled to testing accommodations on the LSAT.  She has also served on the National Board of the ACLU since 2013.  Colker is also an innovator in the classroom and has studied the effectiveness of an ungraded formative assessment in first-year classes.  Before joining the faculty at Ohio State, Colker taught at Tulane University, the University of Toronto, the University of Pittsburgh, and in the Women’s Studies graduate program at George Washington University.  She also spent four years working as a trial attorney in the Civil Rights Division of the United States Department of Justice, where she received two awards for outstanding performance.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Colker discusses her book, “The Public Insult Playbook: How Abusers in Power Undermine Civil Rights Reform,” the impact those in power continue to have on the vulnerable populations in our community and their influence on our political discourse and policies in the United States.

    “Story in the Public Square” continues to broadcast each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m., 4:30 p.m. ET, and Sundays at 2:30 a.m. & 2:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • 2022 Spring Event Series Announced

    The Pell Center is pleased to announce our 2022 spring event series.  Tickets to these events are free and will be available approximately two weeks prior to the event date.  Please RSVP for each event on the Pell Center’s Eventbrite page and call 401-341-2927 or email [email protected] with questions.  Scroll to the bottom of this page to sign up for our email list to be notified when tickets become available.  Event updates and registration information will also be posted on the Pell Center’s social media.  The format of in-person events is subject to change based on the course of the pandemic.

    Reading Across Rhode Island – Kickoff Event

    Lorén Spears, Tomaquag Museum; Silvermoon Mars LaRose, Tomaquag Museum; Maureen Nagle, Reading Across Rhode Island

    January 25, 2022 at 7:00 p.m.

    Location: Facebook.com/PellCenter

    This event was held in partnership with the Rhode Island Center for the Book.

     

    Multicultural Education Week Keynote Address: “Finding your Purpose and Redefining Diversity”

    Bertice Berry, Ph.D.

    February 18, 2022 at 7:00 p.m.

    Location: WebEx | Register here

     

    21st Century Leadership:  How to Inspire, Unite and Achieve

    Mark Morial, President & CEO, National Urban League

    March 22, 2022 at 7:00 p.m.

    Location: Salve Regina University | Bazarsky Lecture Hall

     

    Union: The Struggle to Forge the Story of United States Nationhood

    Colin Woodard, Polk Award-Winning Journalist and Historian

    April 21, 2022 at 7:00 p.m.

    Location: Salve Regina University | Bazarsky Lecture Hall

     

    Firekeeper’s Daughter

    Angeline Boulley, Author

    May 26, 2022 6:30 p.m.

    Location: Salve Regina University | Ochre Court

    This event is in partnership with the Rhode Island Center for the Book. A limited number of tickets will be available for Salve Regina University faculty, staff and students.

     

  • “The People’s Gallery:” Art in the Heart of the Conflict with Tom Kelly and Kevin Hasson

    Air Dates: February 14-20, 2022

    For one generation of Americans, civil and sectarian violence in Northern Ireland was brought into our homes through regular reporting on the nightly news. For a younger generation, it was brought home in the powerful lyrics of the band known as U2.  Tom Kelly and Kevin Hasson of the Bogside Artists are creating street art and murals that remember that era in Northern Ireland’s history.

    Tom Kelly and Kevin Hasson are artists and members of The Bogside Artists, best-known for their outdoor murals called “The People’s Gallery” in the Bogside neighborhood of Derry.  Kelly’s brother William, now deceased, was the third member of The Bogside Artists.  Kelly is a native of Derry, Northern Ireland.  He leads a Celtic Christian community in the heart of the Bogside that provides spiritual support for those affected by the “Troubles.”  He views art as a powerful tool to bring Protestants and Catholics together, using it to assuage religious conflict long before the cultural elite of Northern Ireland recognized its cathartic and healing power.  Coming from a family talented in visual and musical arts, Kevin Hasson’s art has been influenced by his extensive travels.  Apart from his work with the Bogside Artists, he painted many murals across Germany during his twelve-year residency in Frankfurt.  Hasson’s boyhood experiences as a member of The International Voluntary Service in Calcutta, India helped him realize the ubiquity of social injustice and its roots.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Kelly and Hasson describe their work on “The People’s Gallery,” which depict their community’s experience of living through the “Troubles,” several decades of conflict that often turned violent.  They consider their murals a human document and hope viewing the work will be a cathartic experience, not just for the artists, but for the entire community.

    “Story in the Public Square” continues to broadcast each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m., 4:30 p.m. ET, and Sundays at 2:30 a.m. & 2:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.”

  • Examining the Internet’s Impact on our Lives with Pamela Paul

    Air Dates: February 7-13, 2022

    It’s not much of an exaggeration to say the internet changed all of us and everything around us.  Just look at the way we communicate, earn money, date, entertain, and inform ourselves.  Pamela Paul chronicles the things we’ve lost in the process—the charm that comes with some uncertainty and the romance of the time before the internet.

    Paul is the editor of The New York Times Book Review and oversees all book coverage at The New York Times, which she joined in 2011 as the children’s books editor.  She is also the host of the weekly “Book Review” podcast for The Times.  She is the author and editor of “How to Raise a Reader” with coauthor Maria Russo, “My Life with Bob: Flawed Heroine Keeps Book of Books,” “Plot Ensues,” “The Starter Marriage and the Future of Matrimony,” “Pornified,” “Parenting, Inc.,” “By the Book: Writers on Literature and the Literary Life,” and “Rectangle Time,” her picture book for children.  Her work has appeared in The New York Times, The New York Times Magazine, The Washington Post, The Atlantic and Vogue.  She is a former contributor to Time and former correspondent for The Economist and has been a columnist for the Styles section of The Times, Worth magazine and The Economist.  Her latest book, “100 Things We’ve Lost to the Internet,” was published in October 2021.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Paul looks back at the way we used to live before the internet, examining the countless ways it has permeated our daily lives and its impact on everything from our democracy, our privacy and the way we think about our future.

    “Story in the Public Square” continues to broadcast each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m., 4:30 p.m. ET, and Sundays at 2:30 a.m. & 2:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • “All of The Marvels” with Douglas Wolk

    Air Dates: January 31-February 6, 2022

    Some of the most popular and profitable stories today are based on characters created and developed by authors and artists at Marvel Comics.  Douglas Wolk has read all 27,000 issues to unpack the hopes, anxieties, and cultural aspirations in their half-million pages.

    Douglas Wolk is a pop culture critic, teacher and writer, and the author of “All of the Marvels,” “Reading Comics” and “33 1/3: Live at the Apollo.”  He’s written about comics and music for magazines, newspapers and websites including Time, The New York Times, Rolling Stone, The Washington Post, The Believer, Entertainment Weekly, The Los Angeles Times, The Village Voice, Slate and Pitchfork.  Wolk has been a National Arts Journalism Fellow at Columbia University and a Fellow in the USC Annenberg/Getty Arts Journalism Program.  His other projects have included the comic book “Judge Dredd: Mega-City Two” and the record label “Dark Beloved Cloud.”  Wolk has lectured and moderated panels at Comic-Con International, the Experience Music Project Pop Conference, the Center for Cartoon Studies, New York Comic-Con, Rose City Comic Con, Emerald City Comic Con, WonderCon, and elsewhere.  He has appeared in the documentaries “Marvel’s Behind the Mask,” “Cartoon College,” “Ink: Alter Egos Exposed” and “Jandek on Corwood.”  He’s been honored with the Will Eisner Award for Best Comics-Related Book, the Harvey Award for Best Biographical, Historical or Journalistic Presentation, and the Krill Tro Thargo for Service to Thrill-Power.  Currently, he teaches at Portland State University and hosts the podcast “Voice of Latveria.”  His latest book, “All of the Marvels: A Journey to the Ends of the Biggest Story Ever Told,” was published in October 2021, receiving critical acclaim.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Wolk describes comics as sophisticated modes of storytelling.  As he read the Marvel Comics, he began to “[realize] that it was visual, and it was verbal and it was an artist’s work.  It was the world interpreted through somebody’s eye in hand, and that was really, really special, and that stuck with me”

    “Story in the Public Square” continues to broadcast each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m., 4:30 p.m. ET, and Sundays at 2:30 a.m. & 2:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Stories of Hope and Renewal in America’s Heartland with Art Cullen

    Air Dates: January 24-30, 2022

    The rise of instant updates from today’s online news sources have left many to regard the local newspaper as a thing of the past.  But Art Cullen describes how he and his family have kept Iowa’s Storm Lake Times newspaper alive and prosperous in the digital age.

    Cullen is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and editor of The Storm Lake Times, a family-run weekly newspaper in Storm Lake, Iowa.  He has made it his life’s work to ask the big questions, speak truth to power, and share the struggles and successes of his community.  Part cultural history, part memoir, his book, “Storm Lake: A Chronicle of Change, Resilience, and Hope from a Heartland Newspaper” explores the themes of family, community, immigration, and the Heartland’s turbulent history and promising progressive future.  It is both a story of cultural upheaval and loss and a story of successes and surprising sources of optimism for those who still believe in the promise of America.  The small town of Storm Lake is vividly described as a diverse, growing community enhanced by immigration from Mexico, Laos and other countries.  It is a story of how immigration revitalizes America culturally and spiritually, and how a small newspaper plays its role in investigating, explaining and sharing the life of the community around it.  “Storm Lake” was published in 2018.

    “Story in the Public Square” continues to broadcast each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m., 4:30 p.m. ET, and Sundays at 2:30 a.m. & 2:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.