• Leeman, Hattendorf Publish “Forging the Trident”

    The Pell Center is pleased to congratulate Dr. William Leeman on his recently published book, “Forging the Trident: Theodore Roosevelt and the United States Navy,” co-edited with Dr. John Hattendorf of the United States Naval War College.

    “Forging the Trident” is a collection of essays on various aspects of Roosevelt’s lifelong relationship with the U.S. Navy written by leading American naval historians including editors Hattendorf and Leeman.

    Leeman is an associate professor of history at Salve Regina University and director of the University’s Pell Honors Program.  He is also a faculty fellow at the Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy.  Leeman is the author of “The Long Road to Annapolis: The Founding of the Naval Academy and the Emerging American Republic,” which was published in 2010.  He earned his Ph.D. in history from Boston University and previously taught at the United States Military Academy at West Point.

    Hattendorf is the Ernest J. King Professor of Maritime History Emeritus and Senior Advisor at the John B. Hattendorf Center for Maritime Historical Research at the U.S. Naval War College. A former naval officer, he earned his D.Phil. degree in history from the University of Oxford.  He is the author or editor of more than 50 books, including the “Oxford Encyclopedia of Maritime History.”

    Salve Regina University hosted the “Forging the Trident: Theodore Roosevelt and the United States Navy” conference in January 2019.  Sponsored by the U.S. Naval War College’s Hattendorf Center for Maritime Historical Research and the Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy, the conference served as a workshop for the historians who contributed essays to the book.

    “Forging the Trident” is published by the Naval Institute Press and is available to purchase here.

  • Adapting to a Changing World with Jen Schwartz

    Change may be an essential part of human existence, but Jen Schwartz explores the dislocations in human society caused by the speed with which the world is changing around us.

    Schwartz is a senior features editor at Scientific American who produces stories on the intersection of technology and the human condition. She specializes in writing about how society is adapting—or not—to a rapidly changing world, with a focus on climate change and digital disinformation.  During the coronavirus pandemic she has written about the anguish of uncertainty, from the trauma of healthcare workers to the legacy of scientific racism to the chaos of media manipulation.  She co-led the magazine’s 2019 special issue, “Truth, Lies & Uncertainty,” about making sense of reality in unreal times, and contributed an essay about how everyone is an agent in the new information warfare.  Her feature, “Underwater,” about a New Jersey community that is radically adapting to sea-level rise, won the 2019 National Association of Science Writers “Science and Society” award.  Schwartz previously worked as an editor or reporter at Popular Science, GQ, New York, Outside, Self, and The Boston Globe.  She is a veteran researcher skilled in fact-checking and investigative reporting and holds a degree in journalism with a minor in environmental science from Boston University.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square” Schwartz describes covering society’s adaptation to rapid changes including climate, technology, and most recently, the pandemic through her stories of individuals, communities, and ideas.  She says, “in many ways, science is more about uncertainty than it is about certainty,” adding that the emphasis is on making the best decisions with what we do know, while considering what we don’t.

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • 2020 Story of the Year: The Coronavirus Pandemic and Its Impact on American Life

    Air Dates: December 14-20, 2020

    2020 is a year we won’t forget any time soon—though many of us might want to.  From the impeachment trial of the president, through the pandemic, and the 2020 election, this year has seen more than it’s fair share of important narratives.  Dr. Evelyn Farkas helps us make sense of them all and name our 2020 Story of the Year.

    Farkas is one of the nation’s premier voices on American foreign policy and geopolitics, and one of the nation’s most-trusted experts on U.S.-Russia relations.  As Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Russia, Ukraine, Eurasia, she was the U.S. Department of Defense’s top Russia expert under President Barack Obama.  Farkas advised three U.S. Secretaries of Defense during her tenure at the Pentagon and was responsible for policy toward Russia and the surrounding region.  She is an outspoken voice on how America should respond to adversaries and manage aggressors, ranging from Russia to North Korea to Iran.  Expertly positioned to discuss the at times tenuous intersection of foreign objectives and domestic priorities, Farkas appears regularly as an NBC/MSNBC national security contributor to discuss hot-button geopolitical issues.  She serves as Senior Fellow at the German Marshall Fund of the United States and has penned research papers and op-eds featured in most leading publications.  She discusses how America’s position abroad is shifting under the Trump administration, the global gamut of U.S. foreign and defense policy, and current national security challenges including Russia’s role in the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Farkas joins hosts Jim Ludes and G. Wayne Miller to discuss the 2020 “Story of the Year.”

    “It began in late 2019 with reports of a strange new pneumonia in Wuhan, China.  By the middle of March, American governors were shutting down their economies, closing schools, and warning constituents of dark days ahead even while the president of the United States vacillated in his public approach to the seriousness of the threat.  After spring cases peaked, President Trump was quick to urge states to re-open their economies and to get people back to work.

    In the months that led up to the election of 2020, the country was a battleground for two narratives: one emphasized the risk of the virus and the failure of the Trump administration to protect either lives or the economy.  The other narrative said the worst of the pandemic was behind us and that the United States government, led by President Donald Trump, had responded magnificently.

    The American public rendered its judgment on those narratives in a closely contested election, even as the virus surged.  As of this episode’s taping, more than 267,000 Americans have died from this virus, even as hope emerges for promising vaccines.

    In a year that began and ended with hotly contests politics, the “Story of the Year,” is the impact of the pandemic on every aspect of American life: jobs, families, politics, communities, health, and—for far too many—lives.”

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Artistic Resilience with Gayle Kabaker

    Air Dates: December 7-13, 2020

    The uncertainty of a creative career—waiting for acceptance and dealing with rejection—can be an isolating experience. Gayle Kabaker turned artistic resilience into advice for coping through the pandemic.

    Kabaker is a graduate of the Academy of Art in San Francisco and has illustrated for various markets worldwide for over 35 years.  She illustrated her first New Yorker magazine cover, “June Brides,” in 2012, which celebrated gay marriage, and has subsequently illustrated five other covers for the New Yorker.  She uses travel as her inspiration, sometimes creating illustrated stories from her experiences.  Kabaker enjoys collaborating with Animators, filmmakers, editors & musicians to match talent with various projects.  She describes her creative process as “a combination of old school painting, mostly with Acryla Gouache paint, that I scan and finish in Photoshop.”  She adds, “I am also dipping my toe slowly into the world of “fine art” and selling original paintings and prints.”  Kabaker is also the illustrator of a book in art exhibition called “Vital Voices,” which celebrates a hundred women leaders and honors 100 years of women’s suffrage in America. Her portfolio with her illustrated stories and other projects can be found here.

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

     

  • Harnessing the Power of Laughter with Gina Brillon

    Air Dates: November 30-December 6, 2020

    There hasn’t been a lot to laugh about in 2020, but Gina Brillon reminds us of the power of laughter and good humor even amidst so much tragedy.

    Brillon is a standup comic, singer, published writer, and poet.  Her newest one-hour comedy special, “Gina Brillon: The Floor is Lava,” is now available on Amazon Prime Video, along with her first one-hour special, “Pacifically Speaking.”  She also performs in the HA Festival: The Art of Comedy on HBO Max.  Her half-hour comedy special, “Easily Offended,” was one of the top shows from the Entre Nos franchise on HBO Latino, and streams on all HBO Digital Platforms.  She has appeared on Comedy Central’s “Live at Gotham,” E!’s “Chelsea Lately,” “The View,” “Late Night with Seth Meyers” and “Jimmy Kimmel Live.” Brillon also appeared on “Kevin Can Wait” on CBS and “The Conners” on ABC.  In 2012, she became the first and only Latina winner of NBC’s Stand up for Diversity Showcase.  The following year, she was a “New Face” at the Montreal Just for Laughs Festival.  In 2019, she was featured on Gabriel “Fluffy” Iglesias’ “Beyond the Fluffy Tour,” which visited 46 cities across the United States.  She co-hosts the podcast, “Mess In Progress,” with Katherine G. Mendoza.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Brillion discusses her Amazon Prime special, “The Floor is Lava.”  She says this one-hour special is unique because of how much creative control she had.  She says, “I was so happy with that because there’s not a lot of people [in the comedy industry who] would trust an artist enough to let them do all that creative work. It has a special place in my heart because of how much work went into it and how much of my personality is in every aspect of it.”

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

     

  • Making the Case for Multiparty Democracy with Lee Drutman

    Air Dates: November 23-29, 2020

    America’s founders feared the rise of political factions that would pit Americans against Americans.  Lee Drutman warns that the founders’ greatest nightmares have come true and threaten the health and welfare of our republic.

    Dr. Lee Drutman is a senior fellow in the Political Reform program at New America.  He is the author of “Breaking the Two-Party Doom Loop: The Case for Multiparty Democracy in America” and “The Business of America is Lobbying,” winner of the 2016 American Political Science Association’s Robert A. Dahl Award, given for “scholarship of the highest quality on the subject of democracy.”  He is also the co-host of the podcast “Politics in Question,” and writes for the New York Times, Vox, and FiveThirtyEight, among other outlets.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Drutman discusses the evolving state of American democracy.  He says the two-party system is now “a very highly nationalized political conflict that is sorted very much along urban rural lines… with a very close balance of power.” He adds, “America is also transitioning to becoming a multi-ethnic democracy in a way that we never have been before,” which exacerbates the division we see today.

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Extraterrestrial Exploration with Andrew Siemion

    Air Dates: November 16-22, 2020

    Science fiction is full of stories about communication and contact with civilizations beyond the stars.  Andrew Siemion leads a multi-national effort to scan the heavens for indications of intelligent life.

    Dr. Andrew Siemion is an astrophysicist and director of the Berkeley Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) Research Center. His research interests include high-energy time-variable celestial phenomena, astronomical instrumentation and the search for extraterrestrial intelligence. Siemion is the Principal Investigator for the Breakthrough Listen program, the “largest ever scientific research program aimed at finding evidence of civilizations beyond Earth.” In 2018, he was named the Bernard M. Oliver Chair for SETI at the SETI Institute and was elected to the International Academy of Astronautics as a Corresponding Member for Basic Sciences. In September 2015, he testified on the current status of astrobiology to the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology of the United States Congress. He is jointly affiliated with Radboud University Nijmegen and the University of Malta.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Seimion says there are two ways to approach the universe when looking for intelligent life. “You can approach it by projecting all of the worst parts of humanity—all of the fear and the danger and the conflict—and project those out to other civilizations that we might encounter. Or you can project the most beautiful parts of humanity—the art and the love and the comradery that also is a part of the human condition.” He imagines that if there is something potentially negative to discover beyond our Earth, it is just as possible there are beautiful things to discover too.

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

     

  • “Story in the Public Square” to Debut Sixth National Season on Public Television January 4, 2021

    NEWPORT, RI–The four-time Telly Award-winning series “Story in the Public Square” will continue to broadcast across the United States with the debut of its sixth national season beginning January 4, 2021, the show announced. The season will feature 24 new episodes. The show has been in production since January 2017 on SiriusXM Satellite Radio and in southeastern New England from its flagship TV station, Rhode Island PBS.  “Story in the Public Square” is currently seen in more than 80% of the nation’s television markets.

    Hosted by Jim Ludes (Vice President, Salve Regina University) and G. Wayne Miller (Staff Writer, Providence Journal), “Story in the Public Square” is a weekly 30-minute public television program that tries to make sense of the stories shaping public life in the United States and abroad. Featuring great guests talking about big issues, “Story in the Public Square” is a refreshing alternative to the standard news and public affairs offerings.  The program delivers the opportunity to learn the story behind the stories in an accessible format where guests are the focal point.

    “A recent guest called 2020 our global ‘gap year.’ We’ve tried to make the most of it,” said Ludes, “bringing our audience timely and essential conversations about the pandemic and American politics.” He continued, “As we look ahead to a new year and a new season, we know the political calendar and the start of a presidential term will shape some of the national dialogue, but so will the artists and storytellers who have continued their work throughout lockdowns and re-openings. We’re excited to present them to our audience.”

    “The show succeeds because of our guests—incredibly talented artists whose craft gives meaning to the world around us,” said Miller. “Whether a poet, a visual artist, or a scholar, their insights into the human condition ground us and enrich our understanding of public life in the United States.”

    A partnership of the Pell Center at Salve Regina University and The Providence Journal, “Story in the Public Square” provides insights and perspectives into culture, politics and current national and international events from diverse storytellers of every variety—from acclaimed filmmakers, scholars, photographers, journalists, activists, historians, musicians and more. The show is produced by the Pell Center at Salve Regina University and presented by Rhode Island PBS via NETA, the National Educational Telecommunications Association.

    The audio version of the series is broadcast multiple times each weekend on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States) channel. “Story in the Public Square” won Telly Awards for excellence in general politics/commentary in 2018, 2019, and twice in 2020.

    Story in the Public Square:

    On the Web: https://pellcenter.org/story-in-the-public-square/

    On Twitter: @pubstory

    On Facebook: www.facebook.com/StoryInThePublicSquare/

  • Exploring Loss, Creativity and Change with Maggie Smith

    Air Dates: November 9-15, 2020

    It is one of the cruel realities of life for every nation and every individual: we all suffer loss and disappointment.  Maggie Smith is a poet whose new book offers wisdom—and hope—for anyone who knows that pain.

    Smith is the author of four books of poetry, including “Good Bones,” “The Well Speaks of Its Own Poison” and “Lamp of the Body.”  Her latest book, “Keep Moving: Notes on Loss, Creativity, and Change,” a collection of essays and quotes, was released in October.  She is also the author of three prizewinning chapbooks.  Her poems are widely published and anthologized, appearing in Best American Poetry, the New York Times, The New Yorker, Tin House, POETRY, The Paris Review, Ploughshares, and elsewhere.  In 2016, her poem “Good Bones” went viral internationally and has been translated into nearly a dozen languages.  Public Radio International called it “the official poem of 2016.”

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Smith says her latest book began as a series of Twitter posts she created as a way of talking herself through a difficult time. She says posting those thoughts in a public space added accountability and she experienced a sense of community that helped her realize she wasn’t alone. She shares an excerpt from “Keep Moving” that reads, “try to shift your thinking away from loss and toward growth. Consider this difficult time a ‘gap year’ between your last life and what might happen next. “Think of it as the first (messy, brave, hard, exhilarating) year of your new life. Keep moving.”

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

     

  • The Coronavirus and the Entertainment Industry with Kate Aurthur

    Air Dates: November 2-8, 2020

    The pandemic has changed a lot of habits—including the ways in which people around the world spend their leisure time and resources.  Kate Aurthur tells us that the entertainment industry—literally built on storytelling—has been among the most effected.

    Aurthur is a veteran entertainment journalist and is editor-at-large at Variety.  She has worked as a top reporter and editor at BuzzFeed News, the Los Angeles Times and the New York Times.  She writes high-impact cover and feature stories about the industry for Variety’s weekly magazine, breaking news on Variety.com and contributes to its video content.  She covers major issues and business trends in TV, film and streaming as the consumption of content across all distribution platforms, including Netflix, Amazon and Apple, continues to reshape the media landscape.  Aurthur also writes about diversity and inclusion in Hollywood, both in front of and behind the camera, profiles prominent writers, directors, producers and actors and covers key festivals and events.  She also contributes to Variety franchises including Actors on Actors, and moderates panel discussions at the company’s summits and conferences.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Aurthur describes the coronavirus’ widespread impact on the American entertainment industry.  As movie theaters closed early this year, she says release dates for many blockbusters were postponed and some were made available through streaming services.  She adds that streaming services were already challenging movie theaters before the virus began and will continue to impact the way consumers experience feature films in the future.

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.