• Recap: Reading Across Rhode Island Kick-Off Event: “Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You”

    On March 11, 2021 Salve Regina University’s Pell Center and the Rhode Island Center for the Book hosted a virtual kick-off event for the 2021 “Reading Across Rhode Island” statewide read, “Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You.” The floor was opened to audience members to ask questions for guest speakers Providence Rhode Island Mayor Jorge Elorza, Valerie Tutson, a founding member and executive director of the Rhode Island Black Storytellers, and Maureen Neagle a middle school English teacher at Moses Brown School.

    “Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You” by Dr. Ibram X. Kendi and Jason Raynolds is a New York Times number-one bestseller and a reimagining of Kendi’s “Stamped,” which reveals the history of racist ideas in America and inspires hope for an antiracist future. The book takes the reader on a racial journey from the past to the present and discusses why racism lingers in our society today. It also proves that while racist ideas have always been easy to fabricate and distribute, they can also be discredited and suggests powerful ways readers can identify and stamp out racist thoughts in their daily lives.

    “You see how immigration began to be a wedge issue, the ultimate tribal us versus them,” said Providence Rhode Island mayor Jorge Elorza. He explained that people who harbor “ethnic resentment” generally have kept quiet about these ideals. However, with President Donald Trump speaking more about it, these people have been more comfortable and confident “stepping out the shadows and making their voices heard.” Elzora also explains how he believes that we should talk to people with both heart and mind. He explains that there are principles of equality and justice and there is an inherent dignity in every human being.

    Children being able to learn and understand these concepts at a young age can also help them to grow up being aware of these issues happening in the world around them. “I think you tell them [about the issues] truthfully,” says Val Tutson. Tuston explains how she started with teaching the history of the Underground Railroad for firth grade and then decided to move those lessons to third grade. She says it is important to give students room to ask questions as they learn about these kinds of topics. “I learned about it when I was eight years old,” says Tuston as she recalls her vivid memories of learning about Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad.

    It is important to introduce topics about racial history even to younger children. By learning about these topics at a younger age, it is easier to understand them more clearly. Even if people have differences, it’s important to be able to understand that we all, deep down, come from the same fountains of freedom and equality and to listen to the heart as well as the mind of others.

    Abigail Ransegnola is an English communications student at Salve Regina University and an intern at the Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy.

  • Jonathan Karp Matches Books with Their Audiences

    Air Dates: May 10-16, 2020

    Books have always seemed like self-contained worlds to me.  Pick up a book, and you can transport yourself to any time in history—or the future. Delve into the mystical or the romantic.  Books help us to open our minds and our hearts, and over the last 30 years, Jonathan Karp has put more of those books into hands than just about anyone else.

    Jonathan Karp has been president and CEO of Simon & Schuster since May 2020. He joined Simon & Schuster in June 2010 as publisher of their flagship imprint and was promoted to president and publisher of Simon & Schuster Adult Publishing in 2018.  Karp worked briefly as a reporter for The Providence Journal and then The Miami Herald before being hired in 1989 by Random House.  He worked there for 16 years, rising to editor-in-chief of the Random House division.  He moved to Hachette Book Group in 2005, where he founded the Twelve imprint.  There, Karp published the acclaimed bestselling works, “True Compass” by Edward M. Kennedy, “God Is Not Great” by Christopher Hitchens, and “War” by Sebastian Junger.  Since joining Simon & Schuster, Karp has overseen the publication of “Steve Jobs” by Walter Isaacson, “What Happened” by Hillary Clinton, “Fear” by Bob Woodward, “Frederick Douglass” by David Blight, the winner of the 2019 Pulitzer Prize in History, “Born to Run” by Bruce Springsteen, “In One Person” by John Irving, and “The Library Book” by Susan Orlean.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Karp says the increase in book sales is one of the strange ironies of the pandemic.  “Obviously it’s been a time of great hardship and suffering for a lot of people […] a lot of them are looking for comfort, or guidance, or escape, and they’re buying books.”  He adds the pandemic has been a time where many readers have gravitated toward what is familiar to them, driving back-list sales up. “[A] lot of our best-known titles are selling better than ever, so the book business is actually very healthy right now.”  With about two thousand books being published at Simon & Schuster each year, Karp says it is their responsibility to make sure each of those books finds its audience.

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Creating a Collective Urban Experience with Julian Chambliss

    Air Dates: May 3-9, 2021

    The analytical mind can explain the world around us, but the creative mind can help create our future. Dr. Julian Chambliss explores the power of Afrofuturism in comic books, the expression of creativity in the midst of the pandemic, and the way we think about and process history as a society.

    Chambliss explores the real and imagined city. From planning and community development to comic books and popular culture, his research, teaching, and writing explore how perceptions shape policy and action creating our collective urban experience.  Chambliss studied urban history at the University of Florida and focused his attention on policy formation, culture, regionalism, and civic infrastructure issues.  His research evolved to focus on urban development and culture in U.S. cities.  Chambliss served as Professor of History in the Department of History at Rollins College from 2004 to 2018.  He joined the Department of English at Michigan State University in 2018 with a joint appointment in the Department of History and as core faculty in Consortium for Critical Diversity in a Digital Age Research.  There, he teaches courses exploring critical making, or the process of creative synthesis that animates his class projects, comics and culture in the United States.  In 2019, Chambliss joined the Michigan State University Museum as the Val Berryman Curator of History, where he designs generative digital projects that use the classroom as a platform for students to act as co-researchers to trace community development, document diverse experience and explore culture.  Chambliss is one of the producers of “Every Tongue Got To Confess,” a podcast exploring the experiences and stories of communities of color.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Chambliss discusses his work around Afrofuturism, which he says “…encompasses the consideration of the black past, the black present and the black future. And it kind of epistemology of transformation and liberation that is advocating for a different set of beliefs, practices and structures that protect, nurture and promote a better future.”

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Continuing the Creative Process during the Pandemic with Ida Darvish and Josh Gad

    Air Dates: April 26-May 2, 2021

    The pandemic has had a profound effect on the entertainment industry, disrupting live performances and posing challenges for production in both film and television.  Ida Darvish and Josh Gad are two of the bright lights of Hollywood and they tell us that the creative process continues.

    Ida Darvish is a producer and actor who has played multiple characters in the “Assassin’s Creed” video game franchise, a common house proprietor on “The Mandalorian,” and Marta Alvarez in Tom Hank’s “Inferno.”  She and her husband have both appeared in “She Wants Me,” “The Lost Nomads: Get Lost!,” and “Big Guy.” Together, they run a production company called “Angry Child,” which has produced a number of shows, notably “Central Park” and “1600 Penn.”

    Josh Gad is an actor and singer and is known for voicing Olaf in the “Frozen” franchise, playing LeFou in the live-action adaptation of Disney’s “Beauty and the Beast” and Elder Arnold Cunningham in the Broadway musical “The Book of Mormon,” for which he received a Tony Award nomination for Best Actor in a Musical.  Gad played Skip Gilchrist in the political sitcom “1600 Penn” on NBC, and a fictionalized version of himself on FX’s The Comedians, alongside “Billy Crystal.”  Several of his other film roles include “The Rocker,” “The Internship,” “Love & Other Drugs,” “The Wedding Ringer,” “The Angry Birds Movie,” “A Dog’s Purpose,” “Marshall,” and Agatha Christie’s “Murder on the Orient Express.”  He has also appeared in “ER,” “The Daily Show,” “Modern Family,” “New Girl,” “Bored to Death,” and “Numb3rs.” In 2020, he began starring in the HBO comedy series “Avenue 5.”  His continuing pandemic series, “Reunited Apart,” has been very popular and it raises money for many charitable causes.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” guests Ida Darvish and Josh Gad discuss how the film and television industry has been criticized for its lack of inclusivity and representation in recent years.  Gad says, “one thing that gives me hope is the greatest driver of influence in our industry is hard cash, and when movies like “Black Panther” make a billion dollars at the box office, […] those are game-changers.”  Both Darvish and Gad hope the industry’s recent improvement in this area is a lasting change.

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Covering the 2021 Academy Awards with Pete Hammond

    Air Dates: April 19-25, 2021

    In the midst of a year that saw pandemic disease, social unrest, and bare-knuckled politics, Hollywood churned out a tremendous body of work—even while theaters closed and films created for the big screen streamed directly to our homes.  Pete Hammond says this year’s Academy Awards reflect the issues facing Americans.

    Hammond is currently Chief Film Critic for Deadline Hollywood, where he has been the Awards Columnist, covering the seemingly year-round Oscar and Emmy seasons, for the past seven years.  For the past eight years, he has been Awards Editor and Columnist for Deadline and previously covered a similar column for the Los Angeles Times.  He has also served as a frequent contributor to Variety and as a film critic for Boxoffice magazine, Backstage magazine, Maxim magazine and Movieline.  He is in his seventeenth year as host of the “KCET Cinema Series” in Los Angeles, and UCLA extension’s “Sneak Preview” for the past ten years.  He also hosts the TV series, “Must See Movies,” which showcases classic films every Friday night and Saturday afternoon on KCET.  He is the recipient of five Emmy nominations for his television writing and is the winner of the 1996 Publicists Guild of America’s Press Award.  He is the second journalist in the organization’s 50-year history to receive the award twice, winning again in 2013.  He also served on the Board of Governors for the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences representing writers for six years.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Hammond discusses the challenges the film industry has faced during the pandemic and several of the Academy Award nominees.  He highlights best picture and best sound nominee, “Sound of Metal,” a film about a heavy-metal drummer who is losing his hearing.  Hammond says, “[t]his is a real example of the art of sound.”  Produced by Amazon Studios for streaming, he adds, “this is the kind of movie that would never have been discovered on any big level, even by the Academy, except for the fact that there was an even playing field this year,” with more viewers utilizing streaming services to watch new releases.

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Nuala Pell Leadership Program Selects Fellows for 2021-2022 Academic Year

    Newport, RI—Eleven rising sophomores, juniors and seniors at Salve Regina University have been selected as fellows for the Nuala Pell Leadership Program for the 2021-2022 academic year.  Named in honor of the late Nuala Pell, wife of Sen. Claiborne Pell and an avid supporter of public service, the program is made up of a select number of diverse, high-achieving student fellows at Salve Regina. Directed by Dr. Martha McCann Rose, the Nuala Pell Leadership Program facilitates leadership development with an emphasis on public service through monthly meetings where students meet with leaders in the public sector and explore leadership theory, ethics and the evolution of public issues.

    The 2021-2022 cohort of Nuala Pell Leadership Program fellows include:

    • Alicia Lopez ‘23, history major and global studies minor, Shoreham-Wading River, N.Y.
    • Alejandra Garcia Silva ‘23, cultural and historic preservation and American history dual major, Los Angeles, Calif.
    • Bethany Martin ‘23, elementary and special education dual major, New Bedford, Mass.
    • Brittany Bailey ‘22, administration of justice and psychology dual major, New Haven, Conn.
    • Elizabeth Nickerson ’23, history and secondary education dual major, Chelmsford, Mass.
    • Eric Peck ‘23, administration of justice major and psychology minor, Glastonbury, Conn.
    • Grace Quasebarth ’24, music performance and Spanish dual major and English literature minor, Cleveland, Ohio
    • Jessica Wright ’23European history major, political science minor, Bradford, R.I.
    • Lindsey Smith ‘23, history major and administration of justice minor, Winchendon, Mass.
    • Peter Tsemberides ’22, administration of justice major, Lake Grove, N.Y.
    • Talia Williams ’23, history major, Woonsocket, R.I.
  • Telling the Stories of the Greatest Generation with Tim Gray

    Air Dates: April 12-18, 2021

    Stories from the Second World War continue to educate, fascinate, and even entertain audiences around the world. Tim Gray tells those stories to educate a new generation about the horrors of war and the heroism of the generation that saved the free world.

    Gray is a national award-winning documentary film director, producer and writer who has produced and directed 17 documentary films on the personal stories of the World War II generation. His latest film is “Surrender on the USS Missouri,” which focuses on the individuals who served on the ship and witnessed the Japanese surrender on September 2, 1945, which ended World War II.  All of Gray’s films air nationally on American Public Television and globally in China, Australia, France and England.  In 2012, his World War II Foundation dedicated the Richard D. Winters Leadership Monument in Normandy, France, honoring American leadership on D-Day and approved by the late Major Richard D. Winters of WWII’s Band of Brothers.  The foundation oversaw all the fundraising for the thirteen-foot statue and organized the dedication event in France, attended by the commanding general of the 101st Airborne Division and former Secretary of Homeland Security, Gov. Tom Ridge. Prior to documentary film making, Gray worked as a television sports and news anchor and reporter for over fifteen years in U.S. markets including Michigan, Washington State, Florida, New York and Rhode Island.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Gray says the Second World War still resonates with many Americans because “they look at that time [as one where young and old] came together and there was one goal and we were a team and I think that’s something that’s definitely lacking today.”

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Addressing the Impacts of our Changing Climate with Michael Oppenheimer

    Air Dates: April 5-11, 2021

    Some call it climate change, others call it a crisis, and still others call it a hoax.  Dr. Michael Oppenheimer tells us to take seriously the impact climate change will have in all of our lives.

    Oppenheimer is the Albert G. Milbank Professor of Geosciences and International Affairs in the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs (SPIA), the Department of Geosciences, and the High Meadows Environmental Institute at Princeton University.  He is the Director of the Center for Policy Research on Energy and the Environment (C-PREE) at SPIA and Faculty Associate of the Atmospheric and Ocean Sciences Program and the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies. Oppenheimer joined the Princeton faculty after more than two decades with The Environmental Defense Fund (EDF), a non-governmental, environmental organization, where he served as chief scientist and manager of the Climate and Air Program.  He continues to serve as a science advisor to EDF.  He has authored over 200 articles published in professional journals and is co-author, with Robert H. Boyle, of a 1990 book, Dead Heat: The Race Against The Greenhouse Effect. He is co-author of the book Discerning Experts: The Practices of Scientific Assessment for Environmental Policy, published in 2020 by the University of Chicago Press.  Oppenheimer is a long-time participant in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) that won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2007, most recently serving as a Coordinating Lead Author on IPCC’s Special Report on Oceans and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate in 2019 and as a Review Editor on the upcoming Sixth Assessment Report.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Oppenheimer says, “One of the reasons there is a high consciousness of this now is that people are starting to see changes in the climate that are not only very noticeable but in many cases, intolerable.”  He adds, we can’t afford to have big cities like Houston and Miami be flooded by storms and high ties year after year, “and we can’t afford to have agriculture in parts of the country gradually be marginalized economically because it’s getting too hot and dry.  These are real economic effects […and] as long as that kind of focus continues, I’m convinced that our government and other governments will get to solving the problem.”

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Nuala Pell Student Fellows Present Research at 12th-annual SRyou Student Exposition

    Above: Nuala Pell Leadership Fellow Ana Inciarte ’22 presents “The Comparison of Surface Hydrophobicity Between Salmonella Enterica Serovars” during an in-person presentation session at the 12th-annual SRyou Student Exposition. 

    Newport RI—Salve Regina University undergraduate students presented their academic and extracurricular research and involvements to an audience of their peers, faculty, staff and community members as a part of the 12th-annual SRyou Student Exposition on Wednesday, March 24.  Among them were the 2020-2021 Nuala Pell Leadership Fellows who presented their research on a wide range of public issues from the racial gap in healthcare access, to the responsibility public leaders have to mitigate stigma around disease outbreaks.

    This year, some student presentations were held on campus, while other sessions, including this session featuring the Nuala Pell Leadership Fellows, were held virtually.  Evan Elichalt, a senior history and economics dual major and philosophy minor, began the session with a discussion on universal basic income, weighing the economic and political risks and benefits its implementation would have on the U.S. economy in his presentation, “Universal Basic Income: A Utopian Idea, or a Necessary Policy?”  He is pictured on the right, presenting during the virtual session on Wednesday.

    Ana Inciarte, a junior biology major with a concentration in microbiology, discussed racial inequity in today’s healthcare system and the implicit biases and history that have contributed to the issue.  She noted several historical instances of medical experiments performed on black men and women, including the infamous Tuskegee syphilis study, that dehumanized their subjects.  Particularly poignant during the coronavirus pandemic, Inciarte contrasted this tragic history with the Center for Disease Control’s recent effort to distribute the vaccines to community health centers, which serve predominantly low-income and minority populations.  She said the priority vaccine-distribution group at these centers is now comprised of “patients who are not proficient in the English language [and] people who are homeless or [live] in public housing.”  As an aspiring OB/GYN, Inciarte hopes to specialize in reproductive endocrinology and provide access to medical care for underserved populations.

    Ryan Miech, a senior studio art major with a triple concentration in graphic design, illustration and interactive media art, presented “The Implications of Cutting Art from Public Education.”  Miech recommended communities struggling to fund school art programs take note of the creative ways inner-city schools leverage flexible solutions to make such programs possible, despite limited funding.  Makenzie Sadler, a junior secondary education and history dual major, presented “What Could Go Wrong?” Public Education in a Global Pandemic,” in which she discussed the challenges the coronavirus pandemic has posed to in-person education.  Her case study contrasted the Pawtucket and Providence Rhode Island public schools’ approaches to educational instruction during the pandemic and their plans for reopening.

    Brittany Bailey, a junior psychology and Administration of Justice dual major presented “Sex Trafficking of Minors in Rhode Island,” identifying the major contributors to the issue, affected populations, and current efforts to combat sex trafficking in Rhode Island.  Bailey conducted a policy analysis on the issue as part of her recent internship.  She is pictured on the left, presenting a group research project entitled, “Observing Jury Bias Between Gender and Age” during an in-person presentation session on Wednesday.  Senior psychology major Callie Crowston-Hickey presented “The Stigma and Perception Regarding Disease in the Time of COVID-19.”  Her research examined the stigmatization of individuals affected by diseases like the coronavirus, and emphasized public leaders’ responsibility to discourage stigmatizing behaviors and disseminate accurate information when addressing disease outbreaks.

    Senior Kyra Dezjot closed the session with her presentation, “How Violent Rhetoric Incites Violent Action: The Rise in Anti-Semitism During the Trump Administration,” in which she examined President Donald Trump’s contribution to the rise of antisemitic attacks during his presidency.  A history and secondary education dual major, Dezjot emphasized her commitment to addressing harmful misconceptions in her classroom.  She said, “[a]s a future leader in the public sector, more specifically, [as] a teacher, I will strive to address hate in my classroom every day.  My classroom [is] now and will be a place of inclusion and where hateful language will not be tolerated.”  As a student teacher, she frequently discusses the historical oppression of minority groups and its impact on current events with her students.

    Nuala Pell Leadership Program Director Dr. Martha McCann Rose was among the students, faculty and staff in attendance at the virtual presentation session.  She remarked, “[e]ach student did a masterful job of researching a public issue and reflecting on it through the lens of leadership.”

    Named in honor of the late Nuala Pell, wife of Sen. Claiborne Pell and an avid supporter of public service, the Nuala Pell Leadership Program provides opportunities to a select number of diverse, high-achieving student fellows at Salve Regina University, exposing them to both the theory and practice of leadership with an emphasis on public service.

     

  • The Guarded Gate: Bigotry, Eugenics, and the Immigration Act of 1924 with Daniel Okrent

    Rebroadcast Dates: March 29-April 4, 2021

    Air Dates: October 28-November 3, 2019

    This episode of “Story in the Public Square” received the Silver award for Best Political/Commentary in Television in the 41st-Annual Telly Awards. 

    In 1924, a new American law ended the wave of immigration to this country that had begun in the 19th century.  Hundreds of thousands of southern- and eastern-European immigrants had entered the United States each year before the law, but after 1924, those numbers were reduced to a trickle.  Daniel Okrent is the author of a remarkable history of the bigotry and sham science that lay at the heart of the Immigration Act of 1924. 

    Okrent is the prize-winning author of six books, including the recently published “The Guarded Gate: Bigotry, Eugenics, and the Law that Kept Two Generations of Jews, Italians, and Other European Immigrants out of America.”  His book “Last Call: The Rise and Fall of Prohibition” was cited by the American Historical Association as the year’s best book on American history. “Great Fortune: The Epic of Rockefeller Center” was a finalist for the 2004 Pulitzer Prize in history. Among his many jobs in publishing, he was corporate editor-at-large at Time Inc., and was the first public editor of the New York Times. Okrent also served on the board of the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery for 12 years, including a four-year term (2003-2007) as chairman, and remains a board member of the Skyscraper Museum and the Authors Guild.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Okrent credits inspiration for the title of his book, “The Guarded Gate,” to the Thomas Bailey Aldrich poem, “Unguarded Gates.” He notes the poem’s use by 20th-century anti-immigration activists, as it gave voice to their belief that the gates in America were unguarded. Okrent says his book “is about how they came to be guarded.”

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 4:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.