• Zakiya Dalila Harris and her novel, “The Other Black Girl”

    Air Dates: July 26-August 1, 2021

    “The Other Black Girl” is one of the most anticipated and critically acclaimed releases of 2021. Part thriller and part social commentary, the author Zakiya Dalila Harris has been heralded for her “genre-bending evisceration of workplace privilege.”

    Zakiya Dalila Harris is based in Brooklyn, New York, and has a passion for writing and talking about Blackness, books, and oldies music. Her debut novel and New York Times bestseller, “The Other Black Girl,” was published in 2021 and was named a Most Anticipated Book of 2021 by TIME, The Washington Post, Harper’s Bazaar, Entertainment Weekly, Fortune, and the BBC. Its television adaptation is currently in development with Tara Duncan, Temple Hill Entertainment, and Hulu.  Harris earned her MFA in nonfiction creative writing from the New School and her bachelor’s degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  She was born and raised in Connecticut.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Harris describes “The Other Black Girl’s” main character, Nella Rogers, as a young, Black editorial assistant working at Wagner Books publishing company in New York.  Working in an all-white office environment, she longs for a coworker who understands her experience.  When Hazel-May McCall joins the firm, Rogers is hopeful just such a person has arrived, but Harris reveals the two women are on diverging paths as the plot turns sinister.

    “Story in the Public Square” continues to broadcast each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs 8:30 a.m., 4:30 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. ET, on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “ Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Learning to Pray with Father James Martin, S.J.

    Air Dates: July 19-25, 2021

    The faithful among us often learn to pray as children.  We ask for things.  We might even, sometimes, say thank you.  Father James Martin asks what it would mean to pray like adults—and offers insights about faith in public life and the challenges to democracy.

    Rev. James Martin, SJ, is a Jesuit priest, editor at large of America magazine and consultor to the Vatican’s Dicastery for Communication.  He is the author of numerous books, including New York Times bestsellers “Jesus: A Pilgrimage, The Jesuit Guide to (Almost) Everything” and “My Life with the Saints,” which Publishers Weekly named one of the best books of 2006.  His latest book, “Learning to Pray, a Guide for Everyone,” was published in 2021.  Martin is a frequent commentator in the national and international media and has appeared on all the major networks and outlets including the Colbert Report, NPR’s Fresh Air, the New York Times and The Wall Street Journal.  Before becoming a Jesuit priest in 1988 he graduated from the Wharton School of Business.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Martin discusses the purpose and challenges of prayer and the role of religion in public life today.  Emphasizing the power of storytelling, Martin says, “arguments and debates close minds down, but stories open minds up.”

    “Story in the Public Square” continues to broadcast each week on public television stations across the United States.  A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link.  In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs 8:30 a.m., 4:30 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. ET, on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “ Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • “Story in the Public Square:” A Look Back at One Year in Virtual Production

    Above: Author and comedian Gina Brillon prepares to tape an episode of “Story in the Public Square” virtually with hosts Jim Ludes and G. Wayne Miller in November 2020.

    In early 2020, news of the coronavirus’ spread across the globe made headlines.  As the first cases emerged in Rhode Island, schools and offices closed; it became clear production of “Story in the Public Square” was no longer possible in the studio.  Determined to adapt, the production crew sprang into action, producing the show virtually.  Co-hosts Jim Ludes and G. Wayne Miller put together their at-home studios and prepared to bring distinguished guests to cloistered audiences tuning in to public television stations across the country.

    Prior to guests arriving on screen, fine-tuning and adapting the available technology proved to be a challenge in the weeks leading up to the first remote episode taping.  Miller reflected on the initial weeks he spent at his home studio in Rhode Island.  He said the pandemic was both a blessing and a curse when producing the show—the curse pertaining to the inevitable technical challenges the crew faced along the way.  He noted the loss of camaraderie that came with “not seeing our crew and having guests in-person at the studio” was an added setback.

    The blessing of being remote, Miller continued, has been hosting guests from all over North America who would not have otherwise had time to make the trip to the Rhode Island PBS Studio.  “I am thinking especially of guests from California, Colorado and Oregon, and even British Columbia, including some in the film and televisions industries, who have graced our show during the pandemic,” he said.

    Reflecting on the last year, Ludes said, “we produced over 60 new episodes remotely after the pandemic hit.  The constant, the one thing that has carried the show from its earliest days has been the guests—incredible storytellers, scholars, and artists—who don’t just expand our understanding of the world, they expand our understanding of what it means to be human.”

    Guests like Mo Rocca, Tricia Rose, Robert Dallek, Josh Gad, Ida Darvish, and Dr. Megan Ranney have shed light on the latest information surrounding the pandemic and provided context for the wide range of issues facing Americans over the last year.  As “Story in the Public Square” begins broadcasting its seventh national season this month, the incredible guests who share their diverse perspectives and stories continue to drive its success.

    “After every episode, Jim and I talk about how lucky we are to be able to bring these guests to our audience.  We’re grateful to every single one of them,” added Miller.

    Seasoned television producer Carolyn Deady joined the “Story in the Public Square” production team in October 2020, bringing a wealth of industry knowledge to the program.  A former international producer at CSPAN in Washington, D.C., Deady was the liaison with world legislatures, obtaining coverage of parliamentary proceedings for broadcast to offer the CSPAN audience an international perspective on events affecting the United States.

    Deady said, “I was, and remain, so impressed that Jim, Wayne and the whole crew had continued to produce the show, week after week, with all of the challenges that come with that prospect, especially of the technical sort.  The whole crew at Rhode Island PBS are a joy to work with, maintaining their enthusiasm and dedication throughout this difficult time, and the guests have been amazing!”

    “Story in the Public Square” was also honored with its fifth Telly Award in 2021, winning bronze for its 2020 episode featuring Elizabeth Rush, author of “Rising: Dispatches from the New American Shore.”  Rush’s book was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in General Nonfiction and the 2020 Reading Across Rhode Island selectee from the Rhode Island Center for the Book.

    The series continues to broadcast each week on public television stations across the United States.  In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs 8:30 a.m., 4:30 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. ET, on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124.  “Story in the Public Square” is produced by the Pell Center at Salve Regina University and presented by Rhode Island PBS via NETA, the National Educational Telecommunications Association.

     

  • Bringing Powerful Subjects to the Big Screen with Elaine McMillion Sheldon

    Air Dates: July 13-18, 2021

    Documentary filmmakers take us into the lives of their subjects in a way that the written word can’t capture. We see what they see. We get a sense of the physical space they occupy with our own eyes.  We hear their voices.  Elaine McMillion Sheldon weaves these elements together in powerful films that explore everything from love to addiction.

    McMillion Sheldon is an Academy Award-nominated, and Emmy and Peabody-winning documentary filmmaker based in Appalachia. She has been commissioned by Netflix, Frontline PBS, The Center for Investigative Reporting, The Oxford American, The New York Times Op-Docs, TEDWomen, Field of Vision, and The Bitter Southerner. Sheldon is the director of two Netflix Original Documentaries, “Heroin(e)” and “Recovery Boys” that explore America’s opioid crisis. “Heroin(e)” was nominated for a 2018 Academy Award and won the 2018 Emmy Award for Outstanding Short Documentary. The short film premiered at the 2017 Telluride Film Festival and went on to screen hundreds of times across America as part of a community-driven impact campaign. Sheldon has appeared on “The Daily Show” with Trevor Noah, Anthony Bourdain’s CNN show, “Parts Unknown” and “Meet The Press” with Chuck Todd. She’s a founding member of the All Y’all Southern Documentary Collective. She is a recipient of the 2020 John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship in Film and 2021 Creative Capital Awardee. In 2016 she received a highly-competitive national “Breakthrough Award” and fellowship from Chicken and Egg Pictures. She was also named a 2018 USA Fellow by United States Artists, one of the 25 New Faces of Independent Film by Filmmaker magazine, one of 50 People Changing The South by Southern Living magazine, and grants from Sundance, Tribeca, Catapult, Chicago Media Project, and Field of Vision.

    “Story in the Public Square” continues to broadcast each week on public television stations across the United States.  A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link.  In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs 8:30 a.m., 4:30 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. ET, on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “ Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Fifty-Six Rhode Island Students Awarded Pell Medal for Excellence in U.S. History

    Newport, R.I. — Fifty-six students from across Rhode Island have earned the Herbert and Claiborne Pell Medal for U.S. History this year.  The award was originally presented by Senator Claiborne Pell and his wife, Mrs. Nuala Pell, recognizes college and high school students in the state who have excelled in U.S. History.

    Established by the Pell family, the Pell Medal is named for Representative Herbert C. Pell and his son, Senator Claiborne Pell.  Herbert Pell served as a member of Congress and American Minister to Portugal and Hungary, while Claiborne Pell, who is responsible for the creation of the Pell Grants and the National Endowment for the Humanities, served in the Senate for 36 years and worked to strengthen American foreign policy.  The medal, which features a pelican on the left side and an anchor on the right, symbolizes the Pell family and the state of Rhode Island.  The Pell Center at Salve Regina University is proud to honor outstanding students of American history in Rhode Island.

    The winners of the 2021 Herbert and Claiborne Pell Medal for excellence in the study of U.S. History are:

    Barrington    

    Elija Davis, Barrington High School

    Ibrahim Falls, St. Andrew’s School

    Bristol

    Chelsea Goodman, Mt. Hope High School

    Carmen Mei, Roger Williams University

    Central Falls

    Karen Figueroa, Central Falls High School

    Coventry

    Aiden Ward, Coventry High School

    Cranston

    Rachel Cabral, Cranston High School East

    Cumberland

    Thomas Goggin, Cumberland High School

    East Greenwich

    Lila Somvanshi, East Greenwich High School

    East Providence

    Lola Abel, Providence Country Day School

    George Benziger, East Providence High School

    Harrisville

    Kaitlyn Pristawa, Burrillville High School

    Johnston

    Nicholas Petrillo, Johnston Senior High School

    Kingston

    Austin Coppinger, University of Rhode Island

    Lincoln

    Jordan Amorim, Lincoln High School

    Hailey Otero, Davies High School

    Middletown

    Eoin Egan, Middletown High

    Scituate

    Rhiannon Trunzo, Ponaganset High School

    Narragansett

    Andrew Simone, Narragansett High School

    Newport

    Margaret Coen, Rogers High School

    Kyra Dezjot, Salve Regina University

    North Kingstown

    Jack Watson, North Kingstown High School

    Samantha Williams, North Providence High School

    Pawtucket

    Arissa Campbell, Charles E. Shea High School

    Kendra Dos Santos Landim, Blackstone Academy Charter School

    Alious Sissoko, William E Tolman High School

    Portsmouth

    Amalie Kamen, Portsmouth Abbey

    Maeve Sullivan, Portsmouth High School

    Providence

    Catherine Adams, School One

    Kyle Burgess, Providence College

    Nicholas Griffin, Classical High School

    Noel Holl, Rhode Island College

    Eleanor Jenkins, La Salle Academy

    Maddalena Ledezma, Lincoln School

    Ethan Murakami, Rhode Island School of Design

    Aisha Odetunde, Hope High School

    Melanie Pincus, Brown University

    Alyson Newsome, Paul Cuffee Upper School

    Riverside

    Kylie Mulhearn, St. Mary Academy Bay View

    South Kingstown

    Daniel McGovern, South Kingstown High School

    Scituate

    Olivia Barone, Scituate High School

    Smithfield

    Alyse Beauchemin, Bryant University

    Olivia Bilotti, Smithfield High School

    Tiverton

    Gwyneth Hallman, Tiverton High School

    West Greenwich

    Quinn Budnick, The Greene School

    Wakefield

    Aiden Skidds, The Prout School

    Warwick

    Nicholas Maroni, Pilgrim High School

    Alex Mehta, Toll Gate High School

    Nigel Stafford, Bishop Hendricken High School

    Nathaniel Powers, Exeter West Greenwich High School

    West Warwick

    Mae D’Ambra, West Warwick High School

    Westerly

    David Bilotto, Westerly High School

    Wood River Junction

    Isabelle Sullivan-Rackliff, Chariho High School

    Woonsocket

    Ethan Brodeur, Beacon Charter High School for the Arts

    Daliza Reinoso, Woonsocket High School

    Sean Trottier, Mount Saint Charles Academy

  • Fighting for Human Rights for all Americans with Kylar Broadus

    Air Dates: July 5-11, 2021

    The Human Rights Campaign estimates that there are 2 million transgender people living in the United States, today. Yet Kylar Broadus says the fight for human rights is not yet won as long as transgender Americans lack equal rights under the law.

    Kylar Broadus is a Black trans man that has been a pioneer in the movement as an attorney, long-time activist, public speaker, author and professor. Broadus is known worldwide for his avant-garde work in the LGBT and Trans movements. He was just awarded the Trans Trailblazer Award by the LGBT Bar Association of Los Angeles and issue a Proclamation by the City Attorney’s Office of Los Angeles on March 28, 2019. In 2018, he was awarded the 2018 Gentleman of Excellence Award by the Gentlemen’s Foundation of Atlanta. Mastercard featured Broadus for Pride Month that same year, and he was recognized by the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office of King’s County in Brooklyn, New York in 2018 for his contributions to the legal field. Liberty Mutual honored him at the GLAAD Awards for his 30 years contribution to the movement and he was awarded a Certificate of Legal Excellence by the City of New York District Attorney’s Office. The Advocate recognized Broadus as one of “25 Legal Advocates Fighting for Trans Rights.” He was honored to stand with President Obama while signing the Executive Order adding protections for millions of workers in 2014. He is the first out transgender American to testify before the United States Senate in favor of the Employment Non-Discrimination Act in 2012. Broadus was given the Pioneer Award at the Trans faith of Color Conference by the Freedom Center of Social Justice. He is founder and director of the Trans People of Color Coalition the only national organization dedication to the civil rights of transgender people of color and is on the board of the National Black Justice Coalition. He currently serves on the Freedom For All Americans board of directors.

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 4:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Uncovering the Truth Behind a Haunting Holocaust Photograph with Wendy Lower

    Air Dates: June 21-27, 2021

    In 2009, an acclaimed historian of the Holocaust was shown a picture of one family’s execution by Ukrainian allies of the Nazis some 70 years earlier.  In the years that followed, Dr. Wendy Lower’s research gave names to the victims and the killers and lays bare the horror of the Holocaust on an intimate, personal level.

    Dr. Lower is an acclaimed historian and widely published author on the Holocaust and World War II.  She is the John K. Roth professor of history at Claremont McKenna College in Claremont, California.  She was also named the director of the Mgrublian Center for Human Rights at Claremont in 2014.  Lower chairs the Academic Committee of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. and directed the Visiting Scholars Program at the Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies from 2000 to 2004.  Her research and teaching focus on the history of Germany and Ukraine in World War II, the Holocaust, women’s history, the history of human rights, and the history of genocide.  Lower’s 2013 book, “Hitler’s Furies: German Women in the Nazi Killing Fields,” was translated into 21 languages and was a finalist for the 2013 National Book Award in the nonfiction category and for the National Jewish Book Award.  Her latest book, “The Ravine: A Family, A Photograph, a Holocaust Massacre Revealed,” was published in 2021.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Lower describes uncovering the identity of photographer Lubomir Skrovina, the Slovakian company scribe who captured the photograph she researched in “The Ravine.”  She said, “[Skrovina] hid the photos and brought them back to his hometown in Banská Bystrica, which was a center of [Nazi] resistance in Slovakia during the Second World War.”  Skrovina then shared the images with Jewish leaders in Slovakia, warning against Slovakian Jews responding to the deportation call.  He also hid several Jews in the attic of his home.

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Exploring Heartache Through Word and Music with Dessa

    Air Dates: June 14-20, 2021

    Everyone of us knows heartache—the sweet melancholy of a love that just doesn’t work. Multi-talented Dessa traces much of her musical inspiration to that pain, and commissioned a team of neuroscientists to help her fall out of love.

    Dessa is a singer, rapper and writer whose musical resume includes performances at Lollapalooza and Glastonbury, co-compositions for 100-voice choir, performances with the Minnesota Orchestra, and top-200 entries on the Billboard charts. She contributed to the number one album The Hamilton Mixtape: her track, “Congratulations,” has notched over 16 million streams.  Her writing has been published by The New York Times and National Geographic Traveler and broadcast by Minnesota Public Radio and published as a memoir-in-essays, entitled “My Own Devices” in addition to two literary collections.  Dessa has delivered keynote speeches and presentations on art, science, and entrepreneurship, guest lectures at universities and colleges across the United States and a TED Talk about her science experiment on how to fall out of love.  She hosts the “Deeply Human” podcast, created by the BBC and American Public Media.

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Harnessing Love as a Force for Pivotal Change with Valarie Kaur

    Air Dates: June 7-13, 2021

    Love is the stuff of poetry, and heartache, and hope, and songs.  Valarie Kaur says love can be revolutionary and is needed as a public ethic to confront hate, and nationalism, and the violence born from ignorance.

    Valarie Kaur is a renowned civil rights leader, lawyer, best-selling author, award-winning filmmaker, educator, innovator, and celebrated prophetic voice.  She leads the Revolutionary Love Project with a mission to reclaim love as a force for justice.  In the wake of the 2016 election, Kaur’s “Watch Night Service” address went viral with 40 million views worldwide.  Her question, “is this the darkness of the tomb or the darkness of the womb?” reframed the political moment and became a mantra for people fighting for change.  Her debut book, “See No Stranger: A Memoir & Manifesto of Revolutionary Love,” was released in 2020 and expands on her popular TED Talk.  In the last twenty years, Kaur has won policy change on multiple fronts–hate crimes, racial profiling, immigration detention, solitary confinement, internet freedom, and more.  She founded Groundswell Movement, Faithful Internet, and the Yale Visual Law Project to inspire and equip advocates at the intersection of spirituality, storytelling, and justice.  Kaur is a regular commentator on MSNBC and contributor to CNN, NPR, PBS, the Hill, Huffington Post, and the Washington Post.  A daughter of Sikh farmers in California’s heartland, she earned degrees at Stanford University, Harvard Divinity School, and Yale Law School.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Kaur discusses harnessing the power of love to create powerful change in response to the daunting social issues of recent years.  She says, “we know that sound government is necessary, but it’s not sufficient to transition this country into a multiracial democracy. We need a shift in culture and consciousness.  We need a revolution of the heart.  A new way of seeing and being that leaves no one behind.  A kind of love without limit—what I call revolutionary love.”  Kaur’s Revolutionary Love Project aims to better equip individuals with practical tools to reclaim love as a force for justice.

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

     

  • Earning, Learning and Serving: Jamie Merisotis on Human Work in the Age of Smart Machines

     Air Dates: May 30-June 6, 2021

    The prognosticators of doom would have you believe that humanity is cursed to a future without work as Artificial Intelligence replaces people in the workforce.  But Jamie Merisotis says we’ll still be working—doing the kinds of things only human beings can do.

    Jamie Merisotis is a globally recognized leader in philanthropy, education, and public policy and the author of “Human Work in the Age of Smart Machines.”  Since 2008, he has served as president and CEO of Lumina Foundation, an independent, private foundation that is committed to making opportunities for learning beyond high school available to all.  He previously served as co-founder and president of the nonpartisan, Washington, D.C.-based Institute for Higher Education Policy and as executive director of a bipartisan national commission on college affordability appointed by the U.S. President and Congressional leaders. His work includes extensive global experience as an advisor and consultant in southern Africa, the former Soviet Union, Europe and other parts of the world.  A respected analyst and innovator, Merisotis is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations in New York.  Merisotis is the author of the widely-acclaimed book, “America Needs Talent,” named a “Top 10 Business book of 2016” by Booklist.  A frequent media commentator and contributor, his writing has appeared in The Washington Post, New York Times, Wall Street Journal, National Journal, Stanford Social Innovation Review, Washington Monthly, Politico, Roll Call and other publications.  Merisotis serves as chair of the Council on Foundations in Washington, D.C. and was a past chair of The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis, the world’s largest museum for children.  He also serves on the boards of the Central Indiana Corporate Partnership and the UK-based European Access Network.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Merisotis discusses his recent book, “Human Work in the Age of Smart Machines” and the intersection of democracy and human work.  He said, “…we have to cultivate the critical thinking and ethical decision making and analytical reasoning traits—democracy-enhancing traits—not just because it’s a good thing to do, […] but because it helps us develop active citizens, and those active citizens will protect our way of life in ways where I think that human work will give us the meaning and purpose that lead to individual and shared prosperity.”

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.