• Surveying the Human Cost of War with Dr. Michael Fine

    Air Dates: August 15-21, 2022

    When Russian forces invaded Ukraine earlier this year, Dr. Michael Fine was outraged—like a lot of Americans.  So he traveled to see first-hand the human cost of this war.

    Dr. Michael Fine serves as the Chief Health Strategist for the city of Central Falls, R.I. and as a family physician with a practice in Rhode Island.  He is the author of several books, including “Health Care Revolt: How to Organize, Build a Health Care System, and Resuscitate Democracy—All at the Same Time,” published in 2018, “Abundance,” a novel about love, war and redemption, based on his experience as a volunteer during the Liberian Civil War, published in 2019, “Rhode Island Stories,” published in 2021, among others.  Dr. Fine’s career as both a family physician and manager in the field of healthcare has been devoted to healthcare reform and the care of underserved populations. Before his confirmation as Director of Health, Dr. Fine was the Medical Program Director at the Rhode Island Department of Corrections, with a healthcare unit serving 20,000 people a year and a staff of over 85 physicians, psychiatrists, mental health workers, nurses, and other health professionals. He was a founder and Managing Director of HealthAccessRI, the nation’s first statewide direct primary care organization, which made prepaid primary care available to people without employer-provided health insurance. Dr. Fine founded the Scituate Health Alliance, a community-based, population-focused non-profit organization, which made Scituate the first community in the United States to provide primary medical and dental care to all town residents.  He also convened and facilitated the Primary Care Leadership Council, a statewide organization that represented 75 percent of Rhode Island’s primary care physicians and practices.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Fine recounts his visit to the border of Poland and Ukraine as a member of a humanitarian effort to help Ukrainians who were fleeing Putin’s war in the spring of 2022.

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m., 5:30 p.m. ET, and Sundays at 2:30 a.m. & 2:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Shedding Light on the Dark Dynamics of Hollywood and Beyond with Winnie M Li

    Air Dates: August 8-14, 2022

    Of all the hashtag social movements, #MeToo has proven among the most enduring—for its truth, for the power imbalance it revealed, and because so many women had the courage to speak out.  Winnie M Li told her story in her first novel.  Now, in her second novel, she tells another about appearance, reality, and the facades that dominate public life, whether in the film industry or at the corner shop.

    Li is an author and activist who has worked in the creative industries over three continents.  Taiwanese-American and raised in New Jersey, Li studied Folklore and Mythology at Harvard, and later Irish Literature as a George Mitchell Scholar.  Since then, she has written for travel guidebooks, produced independent feature films, programmed for film festivals, and developed eco-tourism projects and now writes across a range of media, including fiction, theatre, journalism, and memoir.  Her debut novel, “Dark Chapter,” is a fictional retelling of her real-life stranger rape in Belfast, from both victim and perpetrator perspectives. It won The Guardian’s Not The Booker Prize in 2017, was nominated for the Edgar Award for Best First Novel, and shortlisted for The Author’s Club Best First Novel Award.  It has been translated into ten languages and Li is currently adapting it for the screen.  Her forthcoming second novel, “Complicit,” was sold in a six-figure pre-empt to Orion Fiction, and later, in a heated five-way auction to Emily Bestler at Atria Books for U.S. rights.  Li is also Co-Founder of the Clear Lines Festival, the UK’s first-ever festival addressing sexual assault and consent through the arts and discussion.  Her ongoing doctoral research at the London School of Economics explores media engagement by rape survivors as a form of activism.  She has delivered over 150 public talks and appeared in TEDx London, The Guardian, The Mail on Sunday, The Times, The Independent, The LA Review of Books, The Chicago Tribune, The Irish Times, BBC World News, Sky News, Channel 4, and BBC Woman’s Hour, among other media outlets.  She has an honorary doctorate from the National University of Ireland, in recognition of her writing and activism.

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m., 5:30 p.m. ET, and Sundays at 2:30 a.m. & 2:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Nuala Pell Leadership Program Selects Fellows for 2022-2023 Academic Year

    NEWPORT, RI—Twelve rising sophomores, juniors and seniors at Salve Regina University have been selected as fellows for the Nuala Pell Leadership Program for the 2022-2023 academic year.  Named in honor of the late Nuala Pell, wife of Sen. Claiborne Pell and an avid supporter of public service, the program is made up of a select number of diverse, high-achieving student fellows at Salve Regina. The Nuala Pell Leadership Program facilitates leadership development with an emphasis on public service through monthly meetings where students engage with accomplished leaders in the public sector and explore leadership theory, ethics and the evolution of public issues.  The Nuala Pell student leadership fellows also present their research on a range of public issues at Salve Regina’s annual SRyou Student Exposition, where undergraduate students share curricular, co-curricular and extracurricular research and involvements with the University community.  The fellowship year culminates with a visit to Washington D.C. where the student leadership fellows meet with both public and private-sector leaders.

    The 2022-2023 cohort of Nuala Pell Leadership Program fellows include:

    • Chloe Calkins ‘24, psychology major, Hebron, Conn.
    • Caroline Chapell ‘23, marketing major, Providence, R.I.
    • Isabelle Cole ‘24, social work major, Chelmsford, Mass.
    • Victor Colin ‘24, financial management major, Greenwich, Conn. (Not pictured)
    • Trey Cruz ‘23, marketing major, Middletown, R.I.
    • Mouna Farkouh ‘25, biology major, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
    • Amy Hoffman ‘23, psychology major, Milford, Mass.
    • Ashley Lefebvre ‘24, marketing major, Narragansett, R.I.
    • Levi Mitchell ‘24, environmental studies major, Olds, Alberta, Canada
    • Liadan O’Connor ‘23, global studies major, Redding, Conn.
    • Mitchell Parrillo ‘24, political science major, Johnston, R.I.
    • Abdou Sow ‘24, mathematics major, Dakar, Senegal (Not pictured)
  • Science and its Role in Public Life with Elena Conis

    Air Dates: August 1-7, 2022

    We grow up being educated on the power of science to explain the physical world.  But Dr. Elena Conis offers a more complex view of the role of science in public life—and the stories and understanding it offers all of us as we grapple with everything from pesticides, to vaccines, and climate change.

    Conis is a writer and historian of medicine, public health and the environment and an affiliate of Berkeley’s Center for Science, Technology, Medicine, and Society and the Department of Anthropology, History, and Social Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco.  Prior to joining the Graduate School of Journalism, she was a professor of history and the Mellon Fellow in Health and Humanities at Emory University.  She was also award-winning health columnist for the Los Angeles Times, where she wrote the “Esoterica Medica,” “Nutrition Lab,” and “Supplements” columns.  Conis’ current research focuses on scientific controversies, science denial, and the public understanding of science, and has been supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Institutes of Health/National Library of Medicine, and the Science History Institute.  Her first book, “Vaccine Nation: America’s Changing Relationship with Immunization,” received the Arthur J. Viseltear Award from the American Public Health Association and was named a Choice Outstanding Academic Title and a Science Pick of the Week by the journal Nature.  Her latest book is “How to Sell a Poison: The Rise, Fall and Toxic Return of DDT.”  She holds a Ph.D. in the history of health sciences from UCSF, master’s degrees in journalism and public health from Berkeley and a bachelor’s degree in biology from Columbia University.

    On this episode of ‘Story in the Public Square,” Conis discusses the importance of understanding the interests and motivations of people and organizations who are considered experts.  “The more we know about their interests, the more we can trust what they’re telling us.”

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m., 5:30 p.m. ET, and Sundays at 2:30 a.m. & 2:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Social Media, Social Fragmentation and What’s Next with Jonathan Haidt

    Air Dates: July 25-31, 2022

    The long arc of history bends towards greater and more complex levels of cooperation.  But Jonathan Haidt says that over the last 10 years American society has become ever more fragmented—all thanks to the rise of social media.

    Haidt is the Thomas Cooley Professor of Ethical Leadership at New York University’s Stern School of Business and a social psychologist whose research focuses on morality and its emotional foundations, cultural variations, and developmental course.  He began his career studying the negative moral emotions, like disgust, shame, and vengeance, then to the understudied positive moral emotions, such as admiration, awe, and moral elevation.  As the co-developer of Moral Foundations Theory, and of the research site “YourMorals.org,” where he uses his research to help people understand and respect the moral motives of people with whom they disagree.  At NYU-Stern, he is applying his research on moral psychology to business ethics, asking how companies can structure and run themselves in ways that will be resistant to ethical failures.  Haidt was named a “top 100 global thinker” in 2012 by Foreign Policy magazine, and one of the 65 “World Thinkers of 2013” by Prospect magazine.  He is the author of “The Happiness Hypothesis: Finding Modern Truth in Ancient Wisdom,” “The Righteous Mind: Why Good People are Divided by Politics and Religion” and “The Coddling of the American Mind: How Good Intentions and Bad Ideas are Setting Up a Generation for Failure,” two of which were New York Times best sellers.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Haidt describes his work around social media and its many implications to our public and political lives today.  He adds, “The odds are that 50 years from now, things will be a lot better, and the technology could end up giving us the best democracy ever.  For now, this new technology is breaking almost everything and social media in its present form is very good at tearing things down, but it’s just not good at building things.”

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m., 5:30 p.m. ET, and Sundays at 2:30 a.m. & 2:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Aging and End-of-Life Care: A Firsthand Account with Dave Iverson

    Air Dates: July 18-24, 2022

    Caring for a sick or aging loved one can be an uncertain journey filled with every emotion—from love and devotion to anger and frustration.  Dave Iverson pulls back the curtain on the decade he spent caring for his elderly mother to offer a modern love story with insights and meaning for anyone who is a caregiver or anyone who has ever loved.

    Iverson is a writer, documentary film producer, director and retired broadcast journalist.  He was 59, he moved in with his 95-year-old mother who could no longer care for herself.  His new memoir, “Winter Stars: An Elderly Mother, an Aging Son and Life’s Final Journey,” tells the story of the 10-year caregiving odyssey they shared until her passing at the age of 105.  Iverson has produced and reported more than 20 documentary specials for PBS, including the Frontline film, “My Father, My Brother and Me” which explored his family saga with Parkinson’s disease.  He has served as a special correspondent to the PBS NewsHour and hosted local PBS and NPR programs for 35 years at Wisconsin Public Broadcasting and at KQED San Francisco.  Iverson is also a founding member of The Michael J. Fox Foundation’s Patient Council.  He is the recipient of a national Emmy, four regional Emmys and numerous film festival citations.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Iverson describes his decision to become his mother’s caregiver at the end of her life, saying, “I didn’t know that being a caregiver would be more challenging than dealing with my own Parkinson’s disease.”  He continues, “providing or receiving care is something we will all experience in some way,” and he hopes “Winter Stars” will help prompt a larger conversation about end-of-life care.

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m., 5:30 p.m. ET, and Sundays at 2:30 a.m. & 2:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Katie Langford Joins Pell Center as Associate Director

    Newport, RI—Katie Langford has been named the new Associate Director of the Pell Center at Salve Regina University.  An experienced researcher and writer, Langford joins the Pell Center at the start of its 25th anniversary year.  In her principal role, she will direct the Pell Center’s research agenda, contributing her own scholarship and supporting the work of fellows affiliated with the Pell Center.

    Langford brings a wealth of experience with her to Salve Regina University.  In her most recent position, she served as Associate Director of Research at EAB where she led projects on higher education.  But it is her education and experience that aligned her so well with the mission of the Pell Center.  A graduate of both New York University (B.A. Philosophy) and American University (M.A. International Peace and Conflict Resolution), Langford has also served in the United States Peace Corps as an English instructor and educational consultant in Ethiopia.

    “We are thrilled to welcome Katie to the Pell Center and Salve Regina University,” said Jim Ludes, Executive Director of the Pell Center.  “Her substantial talents as a thinker and writer and her ability to lead others in that work will help grow the Pell Center in its 25th year and beyond,” he said.

    “I am incredibly grateful for this opportunity to work at the Pell Center because of its storied history and mission as well as the connections the center continues to make with the community, both nationally and internationally, to promote American engagement and civic discourse. It’s my privilege to be a part of it.”

    “Senator Claiborne Pell valued education, American engagement in the world, and public service,” Ludes continued. “His values are Salve’s values, and they are Katie’s, too.  That’s why we’re so thrilled to welcome her to the Pell Center.”

    The Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy at Salve Regina is a multidisciplinary research center focused at the intersection of politics, policies and ideas.  Dedicated to honoring Sen. Claiborne Pell’s legacy, the center promotes American engagement in the world, effective government at home and civic participation by all Americans.

     

     

    Who are your heroes and why?

    “I greatly admire those who have spearheaded grassroots civic movements, like Nelson Mandela, Martin Luther King Jr., Gloria Steinem, and Angela Davis.  I often find myself returning to their words of wisdom.  They are representative of a unique breed of folks who’ve mastered the art of balancing vision and hope with grounded-ness and realism.”

    What public or international issues cause you the most concern or are most interesting to you—and why?

    “Throughout my master’s program, I was often drawn to conflicts and issues that do not generally receive wide media attention, particularly from United States news.  I delved into topics like the Rohingya genocide in Myanmar and the prison industrial complex in the U.S.  Now, like many of us, I am most concerned about the large-scale threats to U.S. democracy, what they signal for our future, and how the narratives that surround them create discord and distort the reality of the past.”

    What did serving in the Peace Corps in Ethiopia teach you?   Is there anything that you didn’t expect?

    “Living and working in Ethiopia gave me an appreciation of the now and helped me practice living in the current moment.  Time moved a little slower in the small city in Southern Ethiopia where I lived—I learned there was always time for a coffee break and to walk a little slower.  There were frequent power outages and limited internet access, so I was often without distraction.  I learned to be more present when I was with friends and colleagues or more focused on the task at hand, like hand-washing my clothes or cooking kita, a naan-like bread, over a mini wood-burning stove.  I also learned to release any plans I made for myself for a day.  I tended to make a plan and stick to it with great stubbornness but that was difficult when the power was out or the post office was closed for lunch.  These unexpected changes helped me release control and go with the flow.  The experience helped me be a better friend, a more present colleague, and a more patient person.”

    You’ve worked with elite American universities and you’ve taught in a financially disadvantaged, developing country.  What could American students learn from the students you worked with in Ethiopia? What could Ethiopian students learn from their American counterparts?

    “In my experience, I witnessed students in both places rely on assumptions to create a narrative about the respective countries.  And I’ve taken this kind of human short-cut myself to build an idea about something new or foreign.  But such assumptions are often too simplistic to accurately convey the complexities of life, and they can be dangerous.  Assumptions about quality of life and cultural norms in a country can quickly slide to those about intelligence, grit, and capability of individuals.  Students—anyone—can learn much more by avoiding assumptions, asking questions, and visiting new places with an open mind.”

    Why did you want to come work at the Pell Center at Salve Regina University?

    “I was drawn to the Pell Center’s approach to tackling large, complex issues, like the future of American democracy.  Many such issues around public policy and international relations can seem far removed from our day to day lives, though they do effect each of us.  I admire the way the Pell Center promotes understanding and discourse among citizens and leaders to increase understanding and open communication.  I was additionally encouraged by the mission of Salve Regina University; to work for an institution that encourages students, staff, and faculty to seek wisdom and promote universal justice for a harmonious world is an honor.”

    If you could solve one world problem with the wave of your hand, what would it be?

    “Income disparity.”

    What is at the top of your bucket list?

    “Travel!  There are so many places I want to see but the current top countries include: Morocco, Ireland, Greece, and Brazil.”

    How is your ideal weekend spent?

    “Reading in the morning with a cup of coffee and nowhere to be, yoga, a swim in the ocean, and dinner with friends and family.”

    Which book could you read over and over again?

    “‘One Hundred Years of Solitude’ by Gabriel García Márquez.”

  • Exploring the Social History of Tuberculosis with Vidya Krishnan

    Air Dates: July 11-17, 2022

    Infectious disease has shaped the course of human history—and, as the last couple of years remind us, it continues to do so.  Vidya Krishnan puts the focus on more than just the viruses and bacteria that cause illness, she turns our attention to societal factors like race, gender, and class to understand the anti-science rhetoric and politics that shape so much of the modern world and limit the global response to disease.

    Vidya Krishnan is a writer and an award-winning journalist who has been reporting on medical science for the last 20 years.  Based in Goa, India, she has written for the Atlantic, the LA Times, The Hindu, as their health and science editor, and for the British Medical Journal.  Her first book, “Phantom Plague: How Tuberculosis Shaped our History,” traces the history of tuberculosis, from its origins as a haunting mystery in the slums of 19th-century New York to its modern reemergence that now threatens populations around the world.  Krishnan details the folk remedies made way for scientific understanding of tuberculosis and its cure in the West and the disease’s remarkable ability to adapt, aided by authoritarian government, science denialism and medical apartheid.  “Phantom Plague” was published in February 2022.

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m., 5:30 p.m. ET, and Sundays at 2:30 a.m. & 2:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Examining Race, Class and Food in the American South with Joseph C. Ewoodzie Jr.

    Air Dates: July 4-10, 2022

    Food is central to the daily existence of Americans, whether we are growing it, shopping for it, preparing it, or consuming it.  Dr. Joseph C. Ewoodzie, Jr. argues that, for many, food intersects with race and class to help form our identity as individuals.

    Ewoodzie is an associate professor of sociology and the Vann Professor of Racial Justice at Davidson College.  He uses qualitative research to examine how marginalized populations in urban areas make sense of inequalities in their everyday lives and ethnographic methods to investigate how those same populations interpret their social selves and the boundaries that both constrain and enable them.  Ewoodzie has used both music and food as a lens to understand the cultural dynamics of African American life in urban settings.  His most recent book, “Getting Something to Eat in Jackson: Race, Class, and Food in the American South,” paints a vivid portrait of African American life in the urban south, using food to explore the complex interactions of race and class.  His first book, “Break Beats in the Bronx: Revisiting Hip Hop’s Early Years,” combines historical and sociological methods to examine symbolic boundaries and tell the creation story of hip hop.  Ewoodzie was awarded the 2021 C. Wright Mills Award for “Getting Something to Eat in Jackson,” a distinction awarded annually by the Society for the Study of Social Problems for the book that “best exemplifies outstanding social science research and a great understanding of the individual and society.”

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Ewoodzie describes the time he spent in Jackson, Miss. writing his book, “Getting Something to Eat in Jackson,” and what he learned from the people who experience the most hardship, how they cope and how it informs their view of themselves.

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m., 5:30 p.m. ET, and Sundays at 2:30 a.m. & 2:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Convicted and Condemned with Keesha Middlemass

    Air Dates: December 30, 2019-January 5, 2020

    Rebroadcast Dates: June 27-July 3, 2022

    With less than 5 percent of the planet’s population, the United States houses 22 percent of the world’s prisoners. The challenges of navigating that system don’t end when the convicted felon completes his or her sentence.  Keesha Middlemass shines a light on the substantial barriers felons face when they try to reenter society.  

    Middlemass is a political science professor at Howard University.  She teaches courses in public policy and American Politics and conducts research on race, institutions, public policy, and marginalized populations, focussing specifically on studying prisoner reentry, the politics of punishment, and racial justice.  Her book, “Convicted & Condemned: The Politics and Policies of Prisoner Reentry” examines the public policies that create significant challenges for men and women reentering society after being convicted of a felony.  Middlemass is a member of the Racial Democracy, Crime and Justice Network (RDCJN), a former Andrew Mellon Post-Doctoral Fellow on Race, Crime, and Justice at the Vera Institute of Justice in New York City, and a former American Political Science Association Congressional Fellow.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Middlemass describes the maze of legislative regulations that revoke, restrict, or retract public benefits for prisoners re-entering society.  She notes that the United States leads the world in incarceration rates with 1.1 million citizens in the prison system, saying, “[America] has a long history of using incarceration as a form of addressing anyone who violates social norms,” including addiction and mental illness. 

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 4:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.