• America’s Search for National Identity with Colin Woodard

    Air Dates: November 29-December 3, 2021

    There are some who argue that the United States of America as a nation, should be defined by its civic identity. A federal Republic that’s found he promised equality under the law and Liberty to all of its people. But there’s a darker side to the American history too, one built on ethnonationalism and white supremacy.  Colin Woodard traces the rise and fall, and rise again of these competed ideas, over the long arc of our national history.

    Woodard is a New York Times bestselling author, historian and Polk Award-winning journalist.  He is a respected authority on North American regionalism, the sociology of United States nationhood, and how our colonial past shapes and explains the present.  He is a POLITICO contributing editor and the State and National Affairs Writer at the Portland Press Herald and Maine Sunday Telegram, where he was a finalist for the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Explanatory Reporting.  A longtime foreign correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor, The San Francisco Chronicle, and The Chronicle of Higher Education, for which he has reported from more than fifty countries.  Author of the award winning “American Nations: A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America,” Woodard has written six books including “The Republic of Pirates,” a New York Times bestselling history of Blackbeard’s pirate gang that was made into a primetime NBC series with John Malkovich and Claire Foye, and “Union: The Struggle to Forge the Story of United States Nationhood.”  His work has appeared in dozens of publications including The Economist, The New York Times, Smithsonian, The Washington Post, The Guardian, Newsweek and Washington Monthly.

    Story in the Public Square” continues to broadcast each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m., 4:30 p.m. and 2:30 a.m. ET, and Sundays at 2:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • The Winter of Peril with Robert Costa

    Air Dates: November 22-28, 2021

    Every president, every public servant in the United States, raises their hand and takes an oath to support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic.  Robert Costa says the end of the Trump presidency saw an unprecedented threat to the Constitutional order emanating from the White House itself.

    Robert Costa is co-author of the new book, “Peril,” with Bob Woodward.  He has been a national political reporter at The Washington Post since 2014 and previously served as moderator and managing editor of “Washington Week” on PBS until 2021.  He was a political analyst for NBC News and MSNBC before that.  Costa joined Washington Week with nearly a decade of reporting experience that began with coverage of movement politics and Capitol Hill, including the battle over health care policy during the Obama presidency and the 2010 mid-term elections.  In 2012, he covered the race for the Republican presidential nomination and published interviews with all the major candidates.  He holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Notre Dame and a master’s degree from the University of Cambridge.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Costa discusses his reporting on the January 6th attacks on the U.S. Capitol.  He says, “[As] I dug into the reporting, [it became apparent that] the real story was far darker.  The president of the United States, Donald Trump was coordinating a sprawling vicious pressure campaign, legally, politically, documented with the John Eastman memo we discovered, on his vice-president, the department of justice, members of Congress to prevent Biden from taking office and pushing the election to the house of representatives, where he was confident house Republicans would do his bidding and vote him into another term, despite losing the popular vote and having the electoral college certify the election for Biden in December.  And this wasn’t an ego trip, a moment of narcissism, this was a coordinated effort from the very top of the United States government.”

    Story in the Public Square” continues to broadcast each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m., 4:30 p.m. and 2:30 a.m. ET, and Sundays at 2:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Dr. Shekhar Saxena on the Pandemic’s Impact on Mental Health Across the World

    Air Dates: November 15-21, 2021

    Since early 2000, the world has become familiar with the impacts of COVID-19: isolation, mask-wearing, and, for far too many, disease and death.  Dr. Shekhar Saxena says there’s another impact we are just beginning to grapple with: the way the pandemic has affected global mental health.

    Saxena is Professor of the Practice of Global Mental Health at the Department of Global Health and Population at the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health. He served in the World Health Organization (WHO) from 1998 to 2018, and served as the Director of the Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse from 2010 to 2018.  In 2017, he received the prestigious Leon Eisenberg Award from Harvard Medical School.  Saxena is the author of more than 350 academic papers.  He served as the editor of the Lancet Series on Global Mental Health 2007 and 2011 and the Lancet Commission on Global Mental Health and Sustainable Development 2018.  He advises policymakers on prevention and management of mental, developmental, neurological and substance use disorders and suicide prevention, and is an active contributor to Harvard’s Global Mental Health initiative.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Saxena discusses the importance of prioritizing mental health on a global scale as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to evolve.

    Story in the Public Square” continues to broadcast each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m., 4:30 p.m. and 2:30 a.m. ET, and Sundays at 2:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • The Politics of Today’s Health Care Issues with Bob Hackey and Todd Olszewski

    Air Dates: November 8-14, 2021

    Democrats and Republicans don’t agree on much—and, generally speaking, they don’t agree on health care policy.  But Robert Hackey and Todd Olszewski tell us that there is a rich history and potential for actual cooperation on policies intended to keep Americans healthy and the nation strong.

    Bob Hackey is a Professor of Health Policy and Management at Providence College and an Affiliate of the Taubman Center for American Politics & Policy at Brown University.  He is the author of two university press books on state health care regulation and the rhetoric of health care reform, and co-edited two other volumes on health care reform.  Hackey’s research on health care professions, health care in popular culture, state health planning, and the regulation of medical providers has appeared in more than 20 peer-reviewed journals including the Journal of the American Medical Association, the Journal of the American Academy of PAs, and the Journal of Popular Culture, among others.  In 2018, he served as a guest editor for the Rhode Island Medical Journal‘s special issue on the PA profession.  For more than a decade, his research has focused on how Americans talk about health care and health care reform.  He earned his Ph.D. in political science from Brown University in 1992.

    Todd Olszewski is an associate professor of health policy and management at Providence College, where he also serves as associate director of the Center for Teaching Excellence.  He was previously a Stetten Fellow in the History of the Biomedical Sciences at the National Institutes of Health.  He has published on the history of heart disease and clinical research in Annals of Internal Medicine, the Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences, and the Rhode Island Medical Journal.  Olszewski’s research focuses on how medical research and public health institutions—like the NIH—translate scientific discoveries into clinical practice, technological innovation, and public policy.  He earned his Ph.D. in history with a concentration in the history of medicine from Yale University in 2008.

    Hackey and Olszewski are co-authors of the new book, “Today’s Health Care Issues: Democrats and Republicans.”

    “Story in the Public Square” continues to broadcast each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m., 4:30 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. ET, and Sundays at 2:30 p.m., 10:30 p.m. and 2:30 a.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Exploring Hidden Networks Below the Forests with Suzanne Simard

    Air Dates: November 1-7, 2021

    Forests have long been celebrated in literature as a repository or life and solitude.  But Dr. Suzanne Simard says they are also an important repository of wisdom—a wisdom passed from tree to tree as they communicate with one another.

    Dr. Simard is a Professor of Forest Ecology in the Department of Forest and Conservation Sciences at the University of British Columbia (UBC), Canada.  She is particularly known for her work on belowground networks that connect the creatures of the forest, and how these are fundamental to the complex adaptive nature of ecosystems. At UBC, she facilitates a vibrant research program, a teaching program focused on forest ecology and complexity science.  A strong contributor to the forestry profession in Canada, her research is motivated by her desire for protecting our fundamental right to a clean and healthy environment.  She contributes to this goal by conducting scientific research on the synergies and complexities of our natural world and the development of sustainable land stewardship practices that both conserve and protect the environment.  Her research is centered on understanding the vital relationships between plants, microbes, soils, carbon, nutrients and water that underlie the adaptability, resilience and recovery of ecosystems.  She works primarily in forests, but also grasslands, wetlands, tundra and alpine ecosystems.  She strives to communicate this research so that it is understandable and usable to all people and is dedicated to empowering people with science-based knowledge and tools to manage and heal the land from human impacts including climate change.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Simard discusses her New York Times best-selling book, “Finding the Mother Tree: Discovering the Wisdom of the Forest.”  Her experience growing up surrounded by the logging industry in British Columbia continues to inform her research and descriptions of the complex, underground communication networks trees have evolved to use.  They perceive one another through these networks, storing information about past climate fluctuations, and cooperate to mount defenses and better adapt to future environmental changes to sustain the forest as a whole.

    “Story in the Public Square” continues to broadcast each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m., 4:30 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. ET, and Sundays at 2:30 p.m., 10:30 p.m. and 2:30 a.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Studying the Classics in the American Judicial System Emily Allen-Hornblower and Nafeesah Goldsmith

    Air Dates: October 25-31, 2021

    The promise of a liberal arts education has always been the insight offered to us by classic texts about the human experience.  Emily Allen-Hornblower and Nafeesah Goldsmith tell us the appeal is not limited just to traditional students in classrooms, but also students learning in environments as challenging as the American judicial system.

    Emily Allen-Hornblower is Associate Professor of Classics at Rutgers University.  She is a graduate of the Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris, France, and received her Ph.D in Classics from Harvard University.  She has published articles on archaic and classical Greek literature, Greek and Roman historiography, and the twentieth-century reception of Greek drama.  She is the author of “From Agent to Spectator: Witnessing the Aftermath in Ancient Greek Epic and Tragedy.”  Her areas of interest include, storytelling, religion and gender, ancient cultural history, ancient Greek and Roman epic, Greek drama, and social justice.  Her book and articles center on both ancient and modern conceptions and portrayals of the human condition, suffering, and connection and disconnection between individuals and groups.  Allen-Hornblower has taught Classics and world history in medium and maximum security prisons in New Jersey, as part of the Scholarship and Transformative Education in Prisons (NJ-STEP) program.

    Nafeesah Goldsmith is the CEO of RISE, Real Intervention Supports Excellence, a mission-based sustainability initiative that supports initiatives that support at-risk communities and building prison-free futures.  When she was 21 years old, she began serving a 15-year prison sentence at the Edna Mahan Correctional Facility for Women, where she began her college career through the Clinton College Bound/NJ-STEP program.  Goldsmith was released from prison on June 23, 2015, and dedicates her time to speaking on incarceration, reentry, the School to Prison Pipeline, and the effects of incarceration on families and communities.  She studied Criminal Justice at Monmouth University after earning a bachelor’s degree in Sociology.  She is also an alumna of Rutgers University and is currently pursuing a degree in law.

    “Story in the Public Square” continues to broadcast each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m., 4:30 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. ET, and Sundays at 2:30 p.m., 10:30 p.m. and 2:30 a.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Michael Paul Williams Named 2021 Recipient of the Pell Center Prize for Story in the Public Square

    NEWPORT, R.I.—Michael Paul Williams, a long-time columnist for The Richmond Times Dispatch, has been named the 2021 recipient of the Pell Center Prize for Story in the Public Square.  Awarded since 2013, the prize honors storytellers whose work has a meaningful, positive impact on the public dialogue.

    Williams joined The Times Dispatch in 1982 and covered local government for a decade before becoming a columnist for the paper a decade later.  His columns have never shied away from sensitive public issues, including race.  Earlier in 2021, he won a Pulitzer Prize for his commentary.

    In 2020, as the United States found itself convulsed by the murder of George Floyd and a summer of protest, Williams penned a series of columns that changed the conversation about race and remembrance in the former capitol of the Confederacy.  In direct, stirring prose, Williams didn’t just urge the removal of confederate statues, he imagined the new heroes that should top their pedestals, whose names should grace schools and boulevards, whose deeds should be remembered: anti-lynching crusaders and social justice activists, not “agents of treason and enslavement.”

    “Michael Paul Williams imagined a new story,” said Jim Ludes, Executive Director of the Pell Center, “not just for the city of Richmond or the state of Virginia, but for an inclusive nation focused not just on its past myths, but on creating a nation for all of its people. For that significant accomplishment, we are humbled to honor him and his work with this award.”

    “I am deeply honored to receive the Pell Center Prize for Story in the Public Square,” said Williams. “When I wrote about Richmond’s removal of its Confederate monuments, amid the protests following the murder of George Floyd, I believed I was telling a larger story about the legacy of white supremacy in America. Because as we can see, the Civil War never truly ended. We are still living out that legacy today.”

    Williams continued, “I’m gratified to be recognized as a storyteller whose work ‘contributes to the public understanding on important issues,’ because the ongoing story of Richmond holds important lessons for a divided nation. If the former capital of the Confederacy can reject symbolic and systemic racism and move beyond it, there’s hope.”

    Williams will receive the Pell Center Prize in a virtual event at 7:00 PM on November 9, 2021.  The event will be streamed live on Facebook.  Those interested in attending the virtual event are asked to register at: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/pell-center-prize-for-story-in-the-public-square-tickets-186955197027?aff=affiliate1.

    In the days that follow, Williams will tape an episode of “Story in the Public Square” for broadcast on public television and SiriusXM Satellite Radio’s POTUS channel.

    “Michael Paul Williams joins a remarkable line-up of Pell Center Prize winners,” said G. Wayne Miller of The Providence Journal who co-directs the Story in the Public Square initiative. “Collectively, their work underscores our shared humanity and challenges us to make the world a better, more just place.”

    Williams is the eighth recipient of the Pell Center Prize and the first since 2019 when Pulitzer Prize-winning author Elizabeth Kolbert was recognized for her reporting on humanity’s impact on all other life on the planet. Two-time Pulitzer winner Dana Priest received the inaugural prize in 2013; Emmy-winning screenwriter and actor Danny Strong was the 2014 winner; Lisa Genova, the best-selling author of “Still Alice,” was honored in 2015; Pulitzer-winning photographer Javier Manzano won in 2016; filmmaker Daphne Matziaraki, whose documentary “4.1 Miles” was nominated for an Oscar, was honored in 2017; and in 2018, Pulitzer-winner and New York Times staff writer Dan Barry won.  The prize was not awarded in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Founded in February 2012, Story in the Public Square is an initiative to celebrate, study and tell stories that matter. A partnership of the Pell Center at Salve Regina University and The Providence Journal, the program produces the five-time Telly Award-winning show of the same name broadcast more than 500 times each week on public television stations across the country and heard five times every weekend on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. channel.

    Visit Story in the Public Square at pellcenter.org, follow on Twitter via @pubstory, and like on Facebook at www.facebook.com/StoryInThePublicSquare/

  • Investigating the Events of January 6, 2021 with Scott MacFarlane

    Air Dates: October 18-24, 2021

    On January 6, 2021, a violent mob stormed the U.S. Capitol seeking to disrupt the peaceful transfer of power.  While our attention has been consumed with things like the pandemic, vaccines, and America’s withdrawal from Afghanistan, Scott MacFarlane reminds us that the investigations into the events of that day—and the prosecutions of those responsible—are just beginning.

    MacFarlane is an investigative reporter with the News4 I-Team and joined NBC after almost a decade of work as a Capitol Hill reporter for the Cox Media Group.  He began his career as a reporter for CBS TV affiliates in Detroit, Cleveland, Grand Rapids and Syracuse.  MacFarlane also once served as a congressional staffer in the U.S. House of Representatives.  His work has led to the creation of five state laws, triggered federal prosecutions, and has been referenced in more than a dozen formal congressional hearings and floor speeches.  MacFarlane has interviewed U.S. presidents, dozens of U.S. senators, governors and a Supreme Court justice, and he’s questioned press secretaries in the White House press briefing room.  He is the recipient of several awards for his work on behalf of children’s safety.  He won the Anna Quindlen Award for Excellence in Journalism from the Child Welfare League of America in 2018.  His series of investigations on public school security has yielded several honors from the Associated Press and a series of Emmy and Edward R. Murrow awards.  His reporting on thoroughbred horse racing deaths in West Virginia triggered a series of new safety state regulations for the sport and earned an award from the Humane Society of the U.S. His series of investigations on the U.S. State Department was honored in 2020 by the National Press Club.  MacFarlane’s investigations of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs inspired a congressional review by the U.S. House Oversight Committee, which played and cited his news reports in a June 2019 hearing.

    “Story in the Public Square” continues to broadcast each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m., 4:30 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. ET, and Sundays at 2:30 p.m., 10:30 p.m. and 2:30 a.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Unwinding Anxiety with Judson Brewer

    Air Dates: October 11-17, 2021

    Colleges and universities all over the United States are facing a wave of students suffering from depression and anxiety heightened by the last year and a half of the pandemic.  Dr. Jud Brewer says there are things everyone can do to be more mindful, to break bad habits, and to be happier.

    Brewer is the Director of Research and Innovation at the Mindfulness Center and associate professor in Behavioral and Social Sciences at the School of Public Health and Psychiatry at the School of Medicine at Brown University.  He is also a research affiliate at MIT.  Before that, he held research and teaching positions at Yale University and the University of Massachusetts’ Center for Mindfulness.  Brewer is a New York Times best-selling author of “Unwinding Anxiety: New Science Shows How to Break the Cycles of Worry and Fear to Heal Your Mind” (March 2021).  He is an addiction psychiatrist and an internationally known expert in mindfulness training for treating addictions.  Based on the success of these programs in the lab, he co-founded MindSciences, Inc. to create app-based digital therapeutic versions of these programs for a wider audience, working with individuals, corporations, and hospital systems to put effective, evidence-based behavior change guidance in the hands of people struggling with unwanted behaviors and “everyday addictions.”

    “Story in the Public Square” continues to broadcast each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m., 4:30 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. ET, and Sundays at 2:30 p.m., 10:30 p.m. and 2:30 a.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Season 8 of “Story in the Public Square” to Premier in January 2022

    NEWPORT, RI – “Story in the Public Square,” the five-time Telly-Award winning series from the Pell Center at Salve Regina University and The Providence Journal, is set to debut its eighth national season during the week of January 3, 2022 with 24 new episodes seen nationally on public television.

    “Story in the Public Square” is a weekly, 30-minute series that centers on storytellers—acclaimed filmmakers, scholars, photographers, journalists, physicians, activists, historians, musicians and more—who share their stories along with analysis of culture, politics and current national and international events.

    The series has been in production at the show’s flagship station, Rhode Island PBS, since January 2017 and is the creative collaboration between its hosts, Jim Ludes (Vice President, Salve Regina University) and G. Wayne Miller (Staff Writer, The Providence Journal.)

    As the complex, world-shaping public issues of the past year have left many searching for hope and insight, “Story in the Pubic Square” has continued to bring inspiring and uplifting storytellers to public television audiences across America, with over 65 new episodes of the show produced throughout the coronavirus pandemic.

    “Why do I love ‘Story in the Public Square?’” asked award-winning correspondent for CBS Sunday Morning, Mo Rocca. “Well, ‘Story’ is always front and center with Jim Ludes and Wayne Miller.  And when so much of media is about self-aggrandizement, their mission is to serve the public.”  He continued, “But more than anything, Jim and Wayne are total ‘squares.’ I mean, these guys actually read my book before I came on the show.  Take it from this square, that’s something special!”

    Padma Venkatraman, best-selling author of “Born Behind Bars” and “The Bridge Home,” said, “since the beginning, “Story in the Public Square” has shown a deep respect for and understanding of diversity and while the hosts are open to listening to people with differing opinions and political views, they have always sought to give a space to voices that have been historically marginalized or underrepresented.”

    Award-winning still photographer and filmmaker Maddie McGarvey was among the photojournalists capturing the pandemic on film as it unfolded.  She said, “[the program] allows the viewer to have a unique perspective on how our environment impacts our everyday lives through experts who dedicate their lives to informing the public.”  She added, “every episode I watch, I learn something new and exciting and I’m thrilled to continue that journey with the renewal of the show in 2022.”  McGarvey’s work has been published in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, CNN, The Washington Post, TIME, among others.

    Jonathan Karp, President and Chief Executive Officer, Simon & Schuster “‘Story in the Public Square’ has proven to be a thoughtful and rewarding forum for discussion of art and ideas.

    Produced from the studios of Rhode Island PBS, Story in the Public Square is currently seen in more than 85% of the nation’s television markets.  It has won Telly Awards for excellence in politics and commentary as well as social impact in 2021, 2020 (twice); 2019, and 2018.  The show is produced by the Pell Center at Salve Regina University and presented by Rhode Island PBS via NETA, the National Educational Telecommunications Association.

    Story in the Public Square:

    On the Web: https://pellcenter.org/story-in-the-public-square/

    On Twitter: @pubstory

    On Facebook: www.facebook.com/StoryInThePublicSquare/