• O’Malley publishes “Directors’ Duties and Corporate Anti-Corruption Compliance”

    The Pell Center congratulates Dr. Patrick O’Malley on his recently published book, “Directors’ Duties and Corporate Anti-Corruption Compliance: The ‘Good Steward’ in U.S. and U.K. Law and Practice.”

    O’Malley is an adjunct fellow at the Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy and teaches graduate courses in Social Justice and Business Ethics and Business Law at Salve Regina University.  A Milan-based international corporate and securities lawyer, he is dual qualified as an attorney both in the United States and in England and Wales and serves a primarily European client base.  He also provides professional legal training at business organizations in Europe and the U.S., and occasionally in Africa and Central Asia, focusing on issues of international corporate governance, transparency and global efforts to combat corporate corruption and bribery.  O’Malley is currently a candidate for a European doctorate in law.

    O’Malley’s book examines the systemic expectations of executive officers and compliance personnel when dealing with anti-bribery, corporate and securities law guidance.  He explores good governance developments concerning anti-bribery efforts in the U.S. and the U.K. and compares the fundamental national compliance experiences there, recognizing the expansion of directors’ duties with each new case of corporate malfeasance in both public and private companies.

    “Directors’ Duties and Corporate Anti-Corruption Compliance” is published by Edward Elgar Publishing and is available to purchase here.

     

  • American Crossroads: What’s Next with Norman Ornstein

    Air Dates: January 18-24, 2021

    A lot of people believe our politics are broken.  Dr. Norman Ornstein says the fault lies squarely with one political party—and will likely shape the course of the Biden administration.

    Ornstein is a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute (AEI), where he studies politics, elections, and the U.S. Congress.  He is a cohost of AEI’s “Election Watch” series, a contributing editor and columnist for National Journal and The Atlantic, a BBC News election analyst, and the chairman of the Campaign Legal Center.  He previously served as codirector of the AEI-Brookings Election Reform Project and senior counselor to the Continuity of Government Commission.  A longtime observer and analyst of American politics and the U.S. Congress, he has been involved in political reform for decades, particularly campaign finance reform and the reform of Senate committees. He has also played a part in creating the Congressional Office of Compliance and the House Office of Congressional Ethics.  Ornstein was elected fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2004.  He is the author of “One Nation After Trump: A Guide for the Perplexed, the Disillusioned, the Desperate, and the Not-Yet Deported,” with E. J. Dionne and Thomas E. Mann, “It’s Even Worse Than It Looks: How the American Constitutional System Collided with the New Politics of Extremism;” “The Broken Branch: How Congress Is Failing America and How to Get It Back on Track,” with Thomas E. Mann and “The Permanent Campaign and Its Future.”

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Ornstein addresses the roots of the dysfunction that currently pervades American politics, saying “…the erosion of the fundamental norms of governance” is largely to blame.  He says, “you can have a constitution, you can have laws, you can have rules, but it’s almost like you have an exoskeleton and the norms are the cartilage and the ligaments that keep it all together. If you don’t have those, the skeleton collapses and we’ve seen this erosion of norms and I would say much of it proceeded Donald Trump.”

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

     

  • 2021 Spring Event Series Announced

    The Pell Center is pleased to announce its 2021 spring event series.  Tickets to these events are free and will be available approximately two weeks prior to the event date.   All events will take place virtually on the Pell Center’s Facebook page.  Please RSVP for each event on the Pell Center’s Eventbrite page and email [email protected] with questions.  To be notified when tickets become available, subscribe to our mailing list at the bottom of this page.

     

    Keeping the Faith: The Past and Future of Civil Rights in the United States

    Bernard Lafayette, Jr., Civil Rights Activist

    Timothy Neary, Salve Regina University Department of History

    Izabella I. Mangual-Solivan ’22, President, Salve Regina Student Government Association

    January 20, 2021, 5:00 p.m. EST

    Location: Facebook.com/PellCenter

    Presented in partnership with the Office of Mission Integration at Salve Regina University.

     

    Reading Across Rhode Island Kick Off Event: Stamped: Racism, Anti-Racism, and You

    Jorge Elorza, Mayor of Providence, Rhode Island

    Maureen Nagle, Education Chair, Reading Across Rhode Island

    Val Tutson, Honorary Chair, Reading Across Rhode Island

    January 26, 2021, 7:00 p.m. EST

    Location: Facebook.com/PellCenter

    Presented in collaboration with the Rhode Island Center for the Book.

     

    COVID-19 Vaccines: Myths and Reality

    Megan Ranney, MD, Brown University

    February 10, 2021, 7:00 p.m. EST

    Location: Facebook.com/PellCenter

     

    The Future of U.S.-India Relations

    Former-U.S. Ambassador Richard Verma

    March 3, 2021, 7:00 p.m. EST

    Location: Facebook.com/PellCenter

     

    The Impact and Potential of Gaming and E-Sports

    Kim Wallace, GameInformer magazine

    March 16, 2021, 7:00 p.m. EDT

    Location: Facebook.com/PellCenter

    *Presented in collaboration with the Salve Regina University eSports club.

     

    *Other events may be added to this series. 

  • Examining Animal Rights in Industrial America with Ernest Freeberg

    Air Dates: January 11-17, 2021

    The end of the 19th Century in America, is often associated with the rise of profound social movements like the temperance movement; the women’s suffrage movement, and—more darkly—even the eugenics movement.  Ernest Freeberg tells the story of the birth of the animal rights movement.

    Freeberg is a Distinguished Professor of Humanities at the University of Tennessee and is the award-winning author of “A Traitor to His Species: Henry Bergh and the Birth of the Animal Rights Movement,” which examines ASPCA founder Henry Bergh’s campaign to grant rights to animals in industrial America.  He is a Distinguished Lecturer for the Organization of American Historians, has served on the editorial board of the “History of Education Quarterly,” and has produced several public radio documentaries.  His research has been supported by grants from the American Council of Learned Societies, the Huntington Library, the Winterthur Museum, Newberry Library, the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the Spencer Foundation, Emory University’s Center for Humanistic Inquiry, and others.  Freeberg has served as Chief Reader and test development committee member for the College Board’s Advanced Placement U.S. History exam.  He is the author of “The Education of Laura Bridgman,” which won the Dunning Prize from the American Historical Association, “Democracy’s Prisoner,” a Los Angeles Times Book Prize finalist in biography, and winner of both the David Langum Award for Legal History and the Eli Oboler Award from the American Library Association’s Intellectual Freedom Roundtable, and “Age of Edison: Electric Light and the Invention of Modern America,” was named a Choice Outstanding Academic Title for 2014 by the American Library Association.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Freeberg describes Henry Bergh’s quest to bring awareness to animal cruelty in industrial America.  “For Berg, the real challenge was touching people’s consciences by making [cruelty] visible to them.  He felt it was frustratingly easy for them to look away.”  He adds that journalists proved to be a powerful tool to share his message with the public.

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Grappling with Mental Illness in 20th-Century America with Robert Kolker

    Air Dates: January 4-10, 2020

    Every family has its secrets. Robert Kolker tells the story of an all-American family in the middle of the 20th century forced to grapple with that era’s stigma and tragic consequences of serious mental illness.

    Kolker is the New York Times bestselling author of “Lost Girls,” named one of the New York Times’ 100 Notable Books and one of Publisher’s Weekly’s Top Ten Books of 2013.  His most-recent book, “Hidden Valley Road,” a number-one New York Times bestseller and Oprah’s Book Club selection, was published in 2020.  His 2006 investigation into sexual abuse in the ultra-Orthodox Jewish community helped bring an abuser to justice and was nominated for a National Magazine Award.  His exploration of an eighteen-year murder-exoneration case and the police tactics that can lead to false confessions received the Harry Frank Guggenheim 2011 Excellence in Criminal Justice Reporting Award from the John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York. Other articles of note include the police shooting of Sean Bell, a close look at New York’s homelessness epidemic, and New York’s cover stories on airport safety and security, and Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger’s Miracle on the Hudson.  Kolker’s journalism has appeared in New York magazine, Bloomberg Businessweek, The New York Times Magazine, Wired, and The Marshall Project.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Kolker describes his approach to writing gripping, humane narratives, saying, “I’m non-prosecutorial, that I’m not interested in finding ‘good guys’ or ‘bad guys’ or passing judgment. I’m interested in helping the world understand [these stories and the people in them] better.”

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

     

  • Rose publishes “Developing Special Educators” with Graham, Renaud

    The Pell Center is pleased to congratulate Dr. Martha McCann Rose on her recently published book, “Developing Effective Special Educators: Building Bridges Across the Profession,” with authors Dr. Alice Tesch Graham and Dr. Gia Anselmo Renaud.

    Dr. Rose and Dr. Graham are professors in the Education Department at Salve Regina University and Dr. Renaud is a professor in the Department of Elementary and Early Childhood Education at Bridgewater State University.  Rose is a faculty fellow at the Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy and directs the Nuala Pell Leadership Program at the University.  During her sixteen years at Salve Regina, she has served on many committees and has been the chair and co-chair for the Education Department and the Dean for the Class of 2017.  Rose holds a doctoral degree in special education from the University of Connecticut.

    Their book emphasizes the importance of building bridges across the teaching profession, outlining a collaborative program for novice teachers to improve practice and gain insight from veteran colleagues, who stay connected to their profession by sharing their experience.  A major theme of the book is the promise of epistemic empathy to sustain professionals in the field and to improve instruction of students with disabilities.  This research-based guide offers plans for support and refection that contribute to sustainable personal and professional growth and strong leadership among practitioners at all levels.

    “Developing Effective Special Educators: Building Bridges Across the Profession” is published by the Teachers College Press and is available to purchase here.

  • Navigating Our Future with Big Tech with Alexis Wichowski

    Air Dates: December 28-January 3, 2020

    Our nationality has long been a part of how we identify ourselves.  But Alexis Wichowski surveys the rise of “net states,” big tech companies that are, increasingly, taking on roles traditionally played by nation-states.

    Wichowski is a public servant, teacher, and writer.  She serves as Deputy Chief Technology Officer for Innovation and Acting Deputy Chief Technology Officer for Broadband for the City of New York.  She also serves as an adjunct associate professor in Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs, teaching in the Technology, Media, and Communications specialization.  She previously served New York City as an Associate Commissioner at the newly established Department of Veterans’ Services and a Disaster Relief Field Responder before and during 9/11.  She has also served as Program Officer for the U.S. Department of State’s Office of eDiplomacy and Diplomatic Innovation Division and as Director of Media Analysis & Strategy at the Permanent Mission of the United States to the United Nations during the Obama administration. She regularly conducts research and writes about the impact of media, technology and government.  Several of her recent publications include. “Net States Rule the World,” in WIRED, “What Government Can and Should Learn from Hacker Culture,” in The Atlantic and “The U.S. can’t regulate Big Tech companies when they act like nations,” in The Washington Post, among others.  Her book, “The Information Trade: How Big Tech Conquers Countries, Challenges Our Rights, and Transforms Our World,” was published in 2020.  Wichowski holds a PhD in Information Science from the University at Albany’s College of Engineering and Applied Sciences and a BA in Chinese from Connecticut College.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Wichowski shares advice she would give the incoming Biden administration on tech regulation, saying, “one of the first things I would suggest for the Biden team is to appoint a tech ambassador—this is not something that America has right now.”  She says, “engaging with tech companies on a diplomatic level would allow us to negotiate for better terms and conditions than we currently have in existence…not in an adversarial only capacity, but in a way that we can have true dialogues with them.”

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Leeman, Hattendorf Publish “Forging the Trident”

    The Pell Center is pleased to congratulate Dr. William Leeman on his recently published book, “Forging the Trident: Theodore Roosevelt and the United States Navy,” co-edited with Dr. John Hattendorf of the United States Naval War College.

    “Forging the Trident” is a collection of essays on various aspects of Roosevelt’s lifelong relationship with the U.S. Navy written by leading American naval historians including editors Hattendorf and Leeman.

    Leeman is an associate professor of history at Salve Regina University and director of the University’s Pell Honors Program.  He is also a faculty fellow at the Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy.  Leeman is the author of “The Long Road to Annapolis: The Founding of the Naval Academy and the Emerging American Republic,” which was published in 2010.  He earned his Ph.D. in history from Boston University and previously taught at the United States Military Academy at West Point.

    Hattendorf is the Ernest J. King Professor of Maritime History Emeritus and Senior Advisor at the John B. Hattendorf Center for Maritime Historical Research at the U.S. Naval War College. A former naval officer, he earned his D.Phil. degree in history from the University of Oxford.  He is the author or editor of more than 50 books, including the “Oxford Encyclopedia of Maritime History.”

    Salve Regina University hosted the “Forging the Trident: Theodore Roosevelt and the United States Navy” conference in January 2019.  Sponsored by the U.S. Naval War College’s Hattendorf Center for Maritime Historical Research and the Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy, the conference served as a workshop for the historians who contributed essays to the book.

    “Forging the Trident” is published by the Naval Institute Press and is available to purchase here.

  • Adapting to a Changing World with Jen Schwartz

    Change may be an essential part of human existence, but Jen Schwartz explores the dislocations in human society caused by the speed with which the world is changing around us.

    Schwartz is a senior features editor at Scientific American who produces stories on the intersection of technology and the human condition. She specializes in writing about how society is adapting—or not—to a rapidly changing world, with a focus on climate change and digital disinformation.  During the coronavirus pandemic she has written about the anguish of uncertainty, from the trauma of healthcare workers to the legacy of scientific racism to the chaos of media manipulation.  She co-led the magazine’s 2019 special issue, “Truth, Lies & Uncertainty,” about making sense of reality in unreal times, and contributed an essay about how everyone is an agent in the new information warfare.  Her feature, “Underwater,” about a New Jersey community that is radically adapting to sea-level rise, won the 2019 National Association of Science Writers “Science and Society” award.  Schwartz previously worked as an editor or reporter at Popular Science, GQ, New York, Outside, Self, and The Boston Globe.  She is a veteran researcher skilled in fact-checking and investigative reporting and holds a degree in journalism with a minor in environmental science from Boston University.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square” Schwartz describes covering society’s adaptation to rapid changes including climate, technology, and most recently, the pandemic through her stories of individuals, communities, and ideas.  She says, “in many ways, science is more about uncertainty than it is about certainty,” adding that the emphasis is on making the best decisions with what we do know, while considering what we don’t.

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • 2020 Story of the Year: The Coronavirus Pandemic and Its Impact on American Life

    Air Dates: December 14-20, 2020

    2020 is a year we won’t forget any time soon—though many of us might want to.  From the impeachment trial of the president, through the pandemic, and the 2020 election, this year has seen more than it’s fair share of important narratives.  Dr. Evelyn Farkas helps us make sense of them all and name our 2020 Story of the Year.

    Farkas is one of the nation’s premier voices on American foreign policy and geopolitics, and one of the nation’s most-trusted experts on U.S.-Russia relations.  As Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Russia, Ukraine, Eurasia, she was the U.S. Department of Defense’s top Russia expert under President Barack Obama.  Farkas advised three U.S. Secretaries of Defense during her tenure at the Pentagon and was responsible for policy toward Russia and the surrounding region.  She is an outspoken voice on how America should respond to adversaries and manage aggressors, ranging from Russia to North Korea to Iran.  Expertly positioned to discuss the at times tenuous intersection of foreign objectives and domestic priorities, Farkas appears regularly as an NBC/MSNBC national security contributor to discuss hot-button geopolitical issues.  She serves as Senior Fellow at the German Marshall Fund of the United States and has penned research papers and op-eds featured in most leading publications.  She discusses how America’s position abroad is shifting under the Trump administration, the global gamut of U.S. foreign and defense policy, and current national security challenges including Russia’s role in the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Farkas joins hosts Jim Ludes and G. Wayne Miller to discuss the 2020 “Story of the Year.”

    “It began in late 2019 with reports of a strange new pneumonia in Wuhan, China.  By the middle of March, American governors were shutting down their economies, closing schools, and warning constituents of dark days ahead even while the president of the United States vacillated in his public approach to the seriousness of the threat.  After spring cases peaked, President Trump was quick to urge states to re-open their economies and to get people back to work.

    In the months that led up to the election of 2020, the country was a battleground for two narratives: one emphasized the risk of the virus and the failure of the Trump administration to protect either lives or the economy.  The other narrative said the worst of the pandemic was behind us and that the United States government, led by President Donald Trump, had responded magnificently.

    The American public rendered its judgment on those narratives in a closely contested election, even as the virus surged.  As of this episode’s taping, more than 267,000 Americans have died from this virus, even as hope emerges for promising vaccines.

    In a year that began and ended with hotly contests politics, the “Story of the Year,” is the impact of the pandemic on every aspect of American life: jobs, families, politics, communities, health, and—for far too many—lives.”

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.