• Nuala Pell Leadership Program Selects Fellows for 2021-2022

    Newport, RI—Ten rising sophomores, juniors and seniors at Salve Regina University have been selected as fellows for the Nuala Pell Leadership Program for the 2021-2022 academic year.  Named in honor of the late Nuala Pell, wife of Sen. Claiborne Pell and an avid supporter of public service, the program is made up of a select number of diverse, high-achieving student fellows at Salve Regina. Directed by Dr. Martha McCann Rose, the Nuala Pell Leadership Program facilitates leadership development with an emphasis on public service through monthly meetings where students meet with leaders in the public sector and explore leadership theory, ethics and the evolution of public issues.

    The 2021-2022 cohort of Nuala Pell Leadership Program fellows include:

    • Alicia Lopez ‘23, history major and global studies minor, Shoreham-Wading River, N.Y.
    • Alejandra Garcia Silva ‘23, cultural and historic preservation and American history dual major, Los Angeles, Calif.
    • Bethany Martin ‘23, elementary and special education dual major, New Bedford, Mass.
    • Brittany Bailey ‘22, administration of justice and psychology dual major, New Haven, Conn.
    • Elizabeth Nickerson ’23, history and secondary education dual major, Chelmsford, Mass.
    • Eric Peck ‘23, administration of justice major and psychology minor, Glastonbury, Conn.
    • Grace Quasebarth ’24, music performance and Spanish dual major and English literature minor, Cleveland, Ohio
    • Lindsey Smith ‘23, history major and administration of justice minor, Winchendon, Mass.
    • Peter Tsemberides ’22, administration of justice major, Lake Grove, N.Y.
    • Talia Williams ’23, history major, Woonsocket, R.I.
  • Telling the Stories of the Greatest Generation with Tim Gray

    Air Dates: April 12-18, 2021

    Stories from the Second World War continue to educate, fascinate, and even entertain audiences around the world. Tim Gray tells those stories to educate a new generation about the horrors of war and the heroism of the generation that saved the free world.

    Gray is a national award-winning documentary film director, producer and writer who has produced and directed 17 documentary films on the personal stories of the World War II generation. His latest film is “Surrender on the USS Missouri,” which focuses on the individuals who served on the ship and witnessed the Japanese surrender on September 2, 1945, which ended World War II.  All of Gray’s films air nationally on American Public Television and globally in China, Australia, France and England.  In 2012, his World War II Foundation dedicated the Richard D. Winters Leadership Monument in Normandy, France, honoring American leadership on D-Day and approved by the late Major Richard D. Winters of WWII’s Band of Brothers.  The foundation oversaw all the fundraising for the thirteen-foot statue and organized the dedication event in France, attended by the commanding general of the 101st Airborne Division and former Secretary of Homeland Security, Gov. Tom Ridge. Prior to documentary film making, Gray worked as a television sports and news anchor and reporter for over fifteen years in U.S. markets including Michigan, Washington State, Florida, New York and Rhode Island.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Gray says the Second World War still resonates with many Americans because “they look at that time [as one where young and old] came together and there was one goal and we were a team and I think that’s something that’s definitely lacking today.”

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Addressing the Impacts of our Changing Climate with Michael Oppenheimer

    Air Dates: April 5-11, 2021

    Some call it climate change, others call it a crisis, and still others call it a hoax.  Dr. Michael Oppenheimer tells us to take seriously the impact climate change will have in all of our lives.

    Oppenheimer is the Albert G. Milbank Professor of Geosciences and International Affairs in the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs (SPIA), the Department of Geosciences, and the High Meadows Environmental Institute at Princeton University.  He is the Director of the Center for Policy Research on Energy and the Environment (C-PREE) at SPIA and Faculty Associate of the Atmospheric and Ocean Sciences Program and the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies. Oppenheimer joined the Princeton faculty after more than two decades with The Environmental Defense Fund (EDF), a non-governmental, environmental organization, where he served as chief scientist and manager of the Climate and Air Program.  He continues to serve as a science advisor to EDF.  He has authored over 200 articles published in professional journals and is co-author, with Robert H. Boyle, of a 1990 book, Dead Heat: The Race Against The Greenhouse Effect. He is co-author of the book Discerning Experts: The Practices of Scientific Assessment for Environmental Policy, published in 2020 by the University of Chicago Press.  Oppenheimer is a long-time participant in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) that won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2007, most recently serving as a Coordinating Lead Author on IPCC’s Special Report on Oceans and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate in 2019 and as a Review Editor on the upcoming Sixth Assessment Report.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Oppenheimer says, “One of the reasons there is a high consciousness of this now is that people are starting to see changes in the climate that are not only very noticeable but in many cases, intolerable.”  He adds, we can’t afford to have big cities like Houston and Miami be flooded by storms and high ties year after year, “and we can’t afford to have agriculture in parts of the country gradually be marginalized economically because it’s getting too hot and dry.  These are real economic effects […and] as long as that kind of focus continues, I’m convinced that our government and other governments will get to solving the problem.”

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Nuala Pell Student Fellows Present Research at 12th-annual SRyou Student Exposition

    Above: Nuala Pell Leadership Fellow Ana Inciarte ’22 presents “The Comparison of Surface Hydrophobicity Between Salmonella Enterica Serovars” during an in-person presentation session at the 12th-annual SRyou Student Exposition. 

    Newport RI—Salve Regina University undergraduate students presented their academic and extracurricular research and involvements to an audience of their peers, faculty, staff and community members as a part of the 12th-annual SRyou Student Exposition on Wednesday, March 24.  Among them were the 2020-2021 Nuala Pell Leadership Fellows who presented their research on a wide range of public issues from the racial gap in healthcare access, to the responsibility public leaders have to mitigate stigma around disease outbreaks.

    This year, some student presentations were held on campus, while other sessions, including this session featuring the Nuala Pell Leadership Fellows, were held virtually.  Evan Elichalt, a senior history and economics dual major and philosophy minor, began the session with a discussion on universal basic income, weighing the economic and political risks and benefits its implementation would have on the U.S. economy in his presentation, “Universal Basic Income: A Utopian Idea, or a Necessary Policy?”  He is pictured on the right, presenting during the virtual session on Wednesday.

    Ana Inciarte, a junior biology major with a concentration in microbiology, discussed racial inequity in today’s healthcare system and the implicit biases and history that have contributed to the issue.  She noted several historical instances of medical experiments performed on black men and women, including the infamous Tuskegee syphilis study, that dehumanized their subjects.  Particularly poignant during the coronavirus pandemic, Inciarte contrasted this tragic history with the Center for Disease Control’s recent effort to distribute the vaccines to community health centers, which serve predominantly low-income and minority populations.  She said the priority vaccine-distribution group at these centers is now comprised of “patients who are not proficient in the English language [and] people who are homeless or [live] in public housing.”  As an aspiring OB/GYN, Inciarte hopes to specialize in reproductive endocrinology and provide access to medical care for underserved populations.

    Ryan Miech, a senior studio art major with a triple concentration in graphic design, illustration and interactive media art, presented “The Implications of Cutting Art from Public Education.”  Miech recommended communities struggling to fund school art programs take note of the creative ways inner-city schools leverage flexible solutions to make such programs possible, despite limited funding.  Makenzie Sadler, a junior secondary education and history dual major, presented “What Could Go Wrong?” Public Education in a Global Pandemic,” in which she discussed the challenges the coronavirus pandemic has posed to in-person education.  Her case study contrasted the Pawtucket and Providence Rhode Island public schools’ approaches to educational instruction during the pandemic and their plans for reopening.

    Brittany Bailey, a junior psychology and Administration of Justice dual major presented “Sex Trafficking of Minors in Rhode Island,” identifying the major contributors to the issue, affected populations, and current efforts to combat sex trafficking in Rhode Island.  Bailey conducted a policy analysis on the issue as part of her recent internship.  She is pictured on the left, presenting a group research project entitled, “Observing Jury Bias Between Gender and Age” during an in-person presentation session on Wednesday.  Senior psychology major Callie Crowston-Hickey presented “The Stigma and Perception Regarding Disease in the Time of COVID-19.”  Her research examined the stigmatization of individuals affected by diseases like the coronavirus, and emphasized public leaders’ responsibility to discourage stigmatizing behaviors and disseminate accurate information when addressing disease outbreaks.

    Senior Kyra Dezjot closed the session with her presentation, “How Violent Rhetoric Incites Violent Action: The Rise in Anti-Semitism During the Trump Administration,” in which she examined President Donald Trump’s contribution to the rise of antisemitic attacks during his presidency.  A history and secondary education dual major, Dezjot emphasized her commitment to addressing harmful misconceptions in her classroom.  She said, “[a]s a future leader in the public sector, more specifically, [as] a teacher, I will strive to address hate in my classroom every day.  My classroom [is] now and will be a place of inclusion and where hateful language will not be tolerated.”  As a student teacher, she frequently discusses the historical oppression of minority groups and its impact on current events with her students.

    Nuala Pell Leadership Program Director Dr. Martha McCann Rose was among the students, faculty and staff in attendance at the virtual presentation session.  She remarked, “[e]ach student did a masterful job of researching a public issue and reflecting on it through the lens of leadership.”

    Named in honor of the late Nuala Pell, wife of Sen. Claiborne Pell and an avid supporter of public service, the Nuala Pell Leadership Program provides opportunities to a select number of diverse, high-achieving student fellows at Salve Regina University, exposing them to both the theory and practice of leadership with an emphasis on public service.

     

  • The Guarded Gate: Bigotry, Eugenics, and the Immigration Act of 1924 with Daniel Okrent

    Rebroadcast Dates: March 29-April 4, 2021

    Air Dates: October 28-November 3, 2019

    This episode of “Story in the Public Square” received the Silver award for Best Political/Commentary in Television in the 41st-Annual Telly Awards. 

    In 1924, a new American law ended the wave of immigration to this country that had begun in the 19th century.  Hundreds of thousands of southern- and eastern-European immigrants had entered the United States each year before the law, but after 1924, those numbers were reduced to a trickle.  Daniel Okrent is the author of a remarkable history of the bigotry and sham science that lay at the heart of the Immigration Act of 1924. 

    Okrent is the prize-winning author of six books, including the recently published “The Guarded Gate: Bigotry, Eugenics, and the Law that Kept Two Generations of Jews, Italians, and Other European Immigrants out of America.”  His book “Last Call: The Rise and Fall of Prohibition” was cited by the American Historical Association as the year’s best book on American history. “Great Fortune: The Epic of Rockefeller Center” was a finalist for the 2004 Pulitzer Prize in history. Among his many jobs in publishing, he was corporate editor-at-large at Time Inc., and was the first public editor of the New York Times. Okrent also served on the board of the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery for 12 years, including a four-year term (2003-2007) as chairman, and remains a board member of the Skyscraper Museum and the Authors Guild.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Okrent credits inspiration for the title of his book, “The Guarded Gate,” to the Thomas Bailey Aldrich poem, “Unguarded Gates.” He notes the poem’s use by 20th-century anti-immigration activists, as it gave voice to their belief that the gates in America were unguarded. Okrent says his book “is about how they came to be guarded.”

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 4:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • Untangling News-Media Bias with Vanessa Otero

    Air Dates: March 21-29, 2021

    Anybody on social media has seen it: dueling posts, arguing over a hot political issue. The protagonists in these online debates are generally sincere in their convictions, but Vanessa Otero says that too many of us remain unaware of the media biases that shape our understanding of the world.

    Otero is the creator of the Media Bias Chart®, the viral image that rates news organizations on their reliability and degree of political bias in their work and maps them accordingly.  The chart prompted lively discussions about where people get their news when it was published.  She is the CEO of Ad Fontes Media, the company she founded in 2018 to fulfill the need revealed by the popularity of the Chart—the need for an easy-to-understand, reliable news rating system.  Otero seeks to impact the way consumers, educators, and organizations deal with today’s complex media landscape through her work at Ad Fontes Media.  She is a practicing patent attorney and earned her J.D. from the University of Denver Sturm College of Law.

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” Otero says her chart of the news-media landscape has revealed a “need for people to understand where news sources fall in terms of reliability and bias [because] everyone has a role to play in making the news-media ecosystem better.”

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

     

  • The Intersection of Incarceration and Mental Health with Christine Montross

    Air Dates: March 15-21, 2021

    The intersection of America’s criminal justice system and mental health is long and, often, misunderstood.  Christine Montross tells us that America’s largest mental health institution isn’t a psychiatric hospital, it’s Cook County Jail in Chicago, Illinois.

    Dr. Christine Montross is a 2015 Guggenheim Fellow in Nonfiction and Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University.  She is also a practicing inpatient psychiatrist and performs forensic psychiatric examinations.  She completed medical school and residency training at Brown University, where she received the Isaac Ray Award in Psychiatry and the Martin B. Keller Outstanding Brown Psychiatry Resident Award.  She received her undergraduate degrees and a Master of Fine Arts in poetry from the University of Michigan.  Montross’s first book, “Body of Work,” was named an Editors’ Choice by The New York Times and one of The Washington Post’s best nonfiction books of 2007.  Her second book, “Falling Into the Fire,” was named a New Yorker “Book to Watch Out For.”  Her latest book, “Waiting for an Echo: The Madness of American Incarceration,” was named a New York Times Book to Watch For, a Time Magazine Book to Read in July and an Amazon.com Best Book of the Month. She has also written for many national publications including The New York Times, The New England Journal of Medicine, Time Magazine, The Washington Post Book World, Good Housekeeping and O, The Oprah Magazine.

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

     

  • A Fresh Take on a New Day in American Politics with S.E. Cupp

    Air Dates: March 8-14, 2021

    In the first months of the Biden administration, we’ve seen an intentional effort by the new president to return the country’s politics to some sense of “normal.” S.E. Cupp is a conservative voice who yearns for a return to substance in American politics.

    Cupp is a CNN political commentator and practical conservative who brings her distinct outlook to CNN programming and special political coverage. She most recently hosted CNN’s “S.E. Cupp Unfiltered,” a weekly program covering the intersection of politics and media. She previously led a panel-driven show on HLN that debated contemporary issues impacting American public life. She joined CNN as a contributor in 2013 and HLN as a host in 2017. Cupp also hosted “S.E. Cupp’s Outside With Insiders,” a digital series on CNN.com where she took political insiders to the great outdoors. Guests on the show included Gov. Scott Walker (R-WI) and Rep. Mark Sanford (R-SC) among others. From 2013 to 2014, Cupp co-hosted “Crossfire” on CNN, the relaunched political debate program with panelists Newt Gingrich, Stephanie Cutter and Van Jones. Before joining CNN as a host and political commentator, Cupp co-hosted MSNBC’s roundtable show, “The Cycle.”

    On this episode of “Story in the Public Square,” S.E. Cupp describes the corrosive division that has seeped into American politics today.  Addressing politicians’ keenness to perpetuate political divisions, she says, “it is more profitable to leave problems unsolved because when you solve them, you can’t run on them, you can’t fundraise off of them, you can’t stoke fear…”  She adds this trend has left people “deeply disillusioned with politics.”

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • The Pandemic Behind the Headlines with Dan Barry

    Air Dates: March 1-7, 2021

    It’s been one year since the coronavirus pandemic upended life across the globe. Dan Barry reminds us that behind the headlines and the previously unimaginable counts of cases and deaths, there are stories of individual lives interrupted and, all too often, cut short by the pandemic.

    Barry is a longtime reporter and columnist for The New York Times, having written both the “This Land” and “About New York” columns. The author of several books, he writes on myriad topics, including sports, culture, New York City, and the nation. Since joining The Times in September 1995, Barry has covered many major events, including the World Trade Center disaster, the destructive wake of Hurricane Katrina, and the unrest in Ferguson, Mo., following the police shooting death of a young black man. His many honors include the 2003 American Society of Newspaper Editors Award for deadline reporting, for his coverage of the first anniversary of Sept. 11; the 2005 Mike Berger Award, from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism; and the 2015 Best American Newspaper Narrative Award. He has also been nominated as a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize twice: once in 2006 for his slice-of-life reports from hurricane-battered New Orleans and from New York, and again in 2010 for his coverage of the Great Recession and its effects on the lives and relationships of America. His most recent honor is the sixth-annual Pell Center Prize for Story in the Public Square, conferred in April 2018.

    Barry previously worked at The Providence Journal, where, as a member of its investigative team, he shared a George Polk Award in 1992, for a series on the causes of a state banking crisis, and a Pulitzer Prize in 1994, for an investigation into Rhode Island’s court system that led to various reforms and the criminal indictment of the chief justice of the state’s Supreme Court. Barry is also the author of “The Boys in the Bunkhouse: Servitude and Salvation in the Heartland,” “Bottom of the 33rd: Hope, Redemption, and Baseball’s Longest Game,” “City Lights,” a collection of his “About New York” columns, and “Pull Me Up: A Memoir,” published in May 2004. A collection of his “This Land” columns is to be released in September 2018. Barry is also one of the writers behind the smash-hit podcast, “Crimetown.”

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.

  • ‘MLK/FBI’ with Sam Pollard and Benjamin Hedin

    Air Dates: February 22-28, 2021

    This episode was made possible with the gracious collaboration of Newport Film and the Rhode Island Council for the Humanities’ “Culture is Key” Project.

    In the 1960s, the Federal Bureau of Investigation spied on civil rights leaders, including Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.  Sam Pollard and Benjamin Hedin tell that story in a powerful documentary that shines a light on race, power, and the politics of personal destruction.

    Sam Pollard’s career as a feature film and television video editor and documentary producer and director spans almost thirty years.  He recently served as Executive Producer on the documentary “Brother Outsider,” the Official Selection for the 2003 Sundance Film Festival. His first assignment as a documentary producer came in 1989 for Henry Hampton’s Blackside production “Eyes On The Prize II: America at the Racial Crosswords.”  One of his episodes in this series received an Emmy.  He returned to Blackside as Co-Executive Producer/Producer of Hampton’s last documentary series, “I’ll Make Me A World: Stories of African-American Artists and Community.”  Pollard received The George Peabody Award for the series.  Pollard also edited a number of Spike Lee’s films, including “Mo’ Better Blues,” “Jungle Fever,” and “Bamboozled.”  Pollard and Lee co-produced several documentary productions for the small and big screen, including “Spike Lee Presents Mike Tyson,” a biographical sketch for HBO, for which Mr. Pollard received an Emmy, and “Four Little Girls,” a feature-length documentary about the 1965 Birmingham church bombings for which Pollard was nominated for an Academy Award. He also edited the acclaimed children’s programs NBC’s “Vegetable Soup” and The Children’s Television Workshop’s “3-2-1-Contact,” for which he received two Emmys.

    Benjamin Hedin has written for The New Yorker, The Atlantic, Slate, The Nation, The Oxford American, The Chicago Tribune, Poets and Writers, Salmagundi, The Georgia Review, and other publications. He is the editor of “Studio A: The Bob Dylan Reader” and author of the nonfiction chronicle, “In Search of the Movement: The Struggle for Civil Rights Then and Now.” Triquarterly Books will publish his first novel, “Under the Spell” in the spring of 2021. He also produced and wrote of the Grammy-nominated documentary “Two Trains Runnin’.” He teaches at the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University.

    “Story in the Public Square” broadcasts each week on public television stations across the United States. A full listing of the national television distribution is available at this link. In Rhode Island and southeastern New England, the show is broadcast on Rhode Island PBS on Sundays at 11 a.m. and is rebroadcast Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. An audio version of the program airs Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. ET, Sundays at 3:30 a.m. & 11:30 p.m. ET on SiriusXM’s popular P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), channel 124. “Story in the Public Square” is a partnership between the Pell Center and The Providence Journal. The initiative aims to study, celebrate and tell stories that matter.