Pell Center

  • The Fourth Reich: Nazism from World War II to Today with Gavriel Rosenfeld

    Air Dates: August 12-18, 2019 Students of history are taught to see events through the eyes of people living in the era they are studying.  From that perspective, history becomes less predictable, decisions seem less certain, and understanding becomes, in fact, more complete.  Gavriel Rosenfeld brings that discipline to the history of “the Fourth Reich,” a fear that has mobilized and motivated Europe and the world since 1945.  Rosenfeld is … Read More

  • After His Holiness: Tibet, Reincarnation Politics and the Future of Sino-Indian Relations

    The relationship between China and India is widely considered one of the most consequential of the twenty-first century.  The impact of China’s repressive policies in Tibet however, is often overlooked.  In his recent article published in Survival, the International Institute for Strategic Studies’ journal for global politics and strategy, Pell Center Senior Fellow Iskander Rehman examines how Chinese influence in Tibet and its desire to exert control over the Dalai … Read More

  • White Identity Politics with Ashley Jardina

    Air Dates: August 5-11, 2019 Identity politics are typically associated with marginalized groups—communities that have been defined as “other” by the dominant group in a political culture. Ashley Jardina argues that there is an emerging white-identity politics in American society today.  Jardina is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Duke University.  Her book White Identity Politics explores the nature of racial attitudes, the development of group identities, and the … Read More

  • Nuala Pell Leadership Program Selects Fellows for 2019-2020

    Ten rising juniors and seniors at Salve Regina University have been selected as fellows for the Nuala Pell Leadership Program for 2019-2020.  This innovative leadership development program is run by the Pell Center and is named in honor of the wife of U.S. Senator Claiborne Pell.  The program facilitates leadership development for the twenty-first century through monthly meetings where students will explore leadership theory, ethics, evolution of public issues and … Read More

  • Native American History with Philip Deloria

    Air Dates: July 1-7, 2019 The British colonies in the New World, and later the United States, were built on land taken from native populations. Philip Deloria explores the interplay of Native Americans and the development of America’s national identity. Deloria is the first tenured professor of Native American history in the long history of Harvard University. His first book, Playing Indian (1998), explores the tradition of white Americans dressing … Read More

  • Immigration and America’s Dairy Farms with Julie Keller

    Air Dates: June 10-16, 2019 The super-heated rhetoric over immigration and border security in the United States today is part of a long tradition of anti-immigration hysteria.  Julie Keller puts our recent panic in a sociological context—exploring changes in who works on American dairy farms, and how they traveled from Latin America to farms in the upper-Mid-West.  Julie C. Keller is an assistant professor of sociology at the University of … Read More

  • New Papers in Series on Timor-Leste Published

    Newport, RI – Today the Pell Center released two new papers on the foreign policy of the Democratic Republic of Timor-Leste. Finding Partners: Timor-Leste’s Evolving Security Ties with Southeast Asia, authored by Natalie Sambhi, explores how Timor-Leste’s sense of geopolitical vulnerability, as a young democracy in an increasingly rivalrous region—when coupled with a number of pressing domestic imperatives—has played a key role in shaping its strategic outlook. Ms. Sambhi is … Read More

  • Disability Rights with Peter Blanck

    Sixty-one million Americans—that’s 26% of the population—live with some kind of disability.  These are our neighbors, our friends, our co-workers, and our family members.  While the Americans with Disabilities Act has improved the lives of many since it became law nearly three decades ago, Peter Blanck tells us the history and the ongoing challenges for those with disabilities can be stark.  Blanck is University Professor at Syracuse University—an academic rank … Read More

  • Human Caused Environmental Catastrophe with Elizabeth Kolbert

    Air Dates: April 22-28, 2019 The fossil record of planet earth tells us that there have been five mass extinctions—the most famous being the fifth that destroyed the dinosaurs. Elizabeth Kolbert warns that we’re in the midst, now, of the sixth extinction and its cause is human activity. Kolbert’s Pulitzer Prize-winning book, The Sixth Extinction, documents the risk to species across the planet. The threat is human activity.  The fabric … Read More

  • The Mueller Report is the Public’s Information

    Information is, truthfully, the coin of the realm in politics and campaigns—it always has been—even more so now in the era of social media where memes, hashtags, and short quips can have lasting and strategic political consequences. Let me share with you a dark secret: since the campaign of 2016, I have marveled at the sophistication I see in the way President Trump and his political operation use information; how … Read More