Featured Slide

  • The Lame Duck Insurrection

    I moved to Washington, DC, when I was 22 years old to go to graduate school at Georgetown University.  I used to visit Capitol Hill regularly to use the Library of Congress.  Every chance I had, I would walk across the street and walk the grounds of the Capitol.  In those days—before Capitol Police officers were murdered in the line of duty in 1998 and before 9/11—you could enter through … Read More

  • Grappling with Mental Illness in 20th-Century America with Robert Kolker

    Air Dates: January 4-10, 2020 Every family has its secrets. Robert Kolker tells the story of an all-American family in the middle of the 20th century forced to grapple with that era’s stigma and tragic consequences of serious mental illness. Kolker is the New York Times bestselling author of “Lost Girls,” named one of the New York Times’ 100 Notable Books and one of Publisher’s Weekly’s Top Ten Books of … Read More

  • Rose publishes “Developing Special Educators” with Graham, Renaud

    The Pell Center is pleased to congratulate Dr. Martha McCann Rose on her recently published book, “Developing Effective Special Educators: Building Bridges Across the Profession,” with authors Dr. Alice Tesch Graham and Dr. Gia Anselmo Renaud. Dr. Rose and Dr. Graham are professors in the Education Department at Salve Regina University and Dr. Renaud is a professor in the Department of Elementary and Early Childhood Education at Bridgewater State University.  … Read More

  • Navigating Our Future with Big Tech with Alexis Wichowski

    Air Dates: December 28-January 3, 2020 Our nationality has long been a part of how we identify ourselves.  But Alexis Wichowski surveys the rise of “net states,” big tech companies that are, increasingly, taking on roles traditionally played by nation-states. Wichowski is a public servant, teacher, and writer.  She serves as Deputy Chief Technology Officer for Innovation and Acting Deputy Chief Technology Officer for Broadband for the City of New … Read More

  • The (Coming) Wave of Vaccine Disinformation

    Since the 1980s, 75 million people have been infected with the human immuno-deficiency virus, the virus that causes AIDS.  32 million people have died.  In 2009, about 1.4 billion people were infected by H1N1, the swine flu.  It killed 575,000 people, globally.  Ebola, in the 2014 outbreak, killed 11,310 people of the 28,616 it infected.  In every one of those cases, disinformation from Russia stoked anxieties, obscured the truth, and … Read More

  • Leeman, Hattendorf Publish “Forging the Trident”

    The Pell Center is pleased to congratulate Dr. William Leeman on his recently published book, “Forging the Trident: Theodore Roosevelt and the United States Navy,” co-edited with Dr. John Hattendorf of the United States Naval War College. “Forging the Trident” is a collection of essays on various aspects of Roosevelt’s lifelong relationship with the U.S. Navy written by leading American naval historians including editors Hattendorf and Leeman. Leeman is an … Read More

  • Adapting to a Changing World with Jen Schwartz

    Change may be an essential part of human existence, but Jen Schwartz explores the dislocations in human society caused by the speed with which the world is changing around us. Schwartz is a senior features editor at Scientific American who produces stories on the intersection of technology and the human condition. She specializes in writing about how society is adapting—or not—to a rapidly changing world, with a focus on climate … Read More

  • 2020 Story of the Year: The Coronavirus Pandemic and Its Impact on American Life

    Air Dates: December 14-20, 2020 2020 is a year we won’t forget any time soon—though many of us might want to.  From the impeachment trial of the president, through the pandemic, and the 2020 election, this year has seen more than it’s fair share of important narratives.  Dr. Evelyn Farkas helps us make sense of them all and name our 2020 Story of the Year. Farkas is one of the … Read More

  • Artistic Resilience with Gayle Kabaker

    Air Dates: December 7-13, 2020 The uncertainty of a creative career—waiting for acceptance and dealing with rejection—can be an isolating experience. Gayle Kabaker turned artistic resilience into advice for coping through the pandemic. Kabaker is a graduate of the Academy of Art in San Francisco and has illustrated for various markets worldwide for over 35 years.  She illustrated her first New Yorker magazine cover, “June Brides,” in 2012, which celebrated … Read More

  • Imagine

    Yesterday, Dr. Robert Redfield, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, warned that this winter could be “the most difficult time in the public health history of the nation.”  According to his estimates, another 200,000 Americans may die in the next two months from COVID-19, which would raise the total death toll to something in excess of 450,000 Americans in less than one year.  To put that … Read More